Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia Broncos buck Clinton-Massie, Goshen James H Boyd Warren A Stanley Jane R Ernst Darrell F Anderson James W Ball Jr June R Paul Robert Kattine Tony W Ratliff Carroll G Boothby Sawyers details revealed in court filing Varnau loses appeal ruling on blocked Goldson investigation Sardinia to hold town hall on street repair “Senior Playground” under roof, to open soon Janet R Whitt Jacqualine Attinger L Mae Spencer Battle between Broncos, G-Men ends in tie SB Warriors rout Peebles, 60-0 Lady Jays celebrate first victory Lady Rockets on a roll Rockets cruise to 4-0 Broncos celebrate homecoming Sininger wraps up another outstanding regular season of high school golf Joan E Stevens Esther R Kennedy Myrtle Mays Sheriff Ellis deploys to Florida Sending gifts from home ABCAP Entrepreneurship Seminar G-Men win streak hits 5 Runners compete at Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady G-Men stand at 3-2-2 SHAC play begins for Ripley golfers Week 3 football roundup Jays rise to 5-2 with win over Williamsburg Audrey F Staten Inmate housing options narrow Opiate addiction strains Municipal Court Lillian E Cowdrey Catherine A Houk Warriors win Jim Neu XC Invite Week 2 football roundup Broncos unbeaten at 4-0 Lady Broncos compete in Bob Schul XC Invite Ronnie L Day Nettie F Lightner Wallace sentenced to life in prison Court filing links Anderson and Sawyers Man killed in Fatal Crash on US 52 Henry E Fields Anleah W Stamper Maxine M Garrett U.S. 68 reopens Drought ends for Lady Rockets G-Men rise to 3-1 with back-to-back victories Rockets cruise to 4-0 win over Jays Lady Broncos start off SBAAC American Division play with 3-2 win over Goshen Week one football roundup Fair board president Orville Whalen passes away

Mercy Health presents scholarships

By Megan Alley

Twelve area high school seniors were presented with scholarships during the Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital Physicians’ Scholarship Awards luncheon held May 3 at the hospital.
Maggie Block, of Amelia High School, Alissa Burns, of New Richmond High School, Gabrielle Crooks, Mariah Harville and Karisa Schock, of Goshen High School, Paige Cummins, of Felicity-Franklin High School/Grant Career Center, Bethany Grayless, of Eastern Brown High School, Bayley Johnson, of Georgetown High School, Katie Mounts, of Bethel-Tate High School, Jessica Shafer, of Clermont Northeastern High School, and Kyle Smith, of Milford High School, were each presented with $1,500 to be used towards their studies in medical fields.
The hospital’s medical staff, according to Dr. Larry Graham, chief of staff, exclusively supports the scholarship fund.
“All the doctors in the hospital pull our money together,” he said.
The hospital has presented scholarships for the past nine years, according to Graham.
“Mercy really wants to give back to the communities because our hospitals are located, not downtown, but in subdivisions. So, for us, it was just part of a way of giving back to the communities,” he  explained. “The decision was made to help support the kids and their academics.”
The selection process starts in January, when the hospital sends information packets to all the high schools in the surrounding counties, including Clermont and Brown.
“We talk to the school counselors, and most of them, because we’ve been doing it for awhile, anticipate the packets coming,” Graham said.
Forty-two students applied for a scholarship this year, whereas in years past, as few as 12 have applied, Graham explained.
“In some years, we’ve only awarded, sometimes, four or five scholarships, but because of the number, and I would say the overall quality of the applications, we gave many more scholarships this year,” he said.
He added, “We expanded the amount because they did such a good job.”
In selecting the winners, which is done solely through an application process without interviews, Graham looks for well-rounded students.
“I think the field this year is a good demonstration of that; we have folks going into nutrition, some are going into nursing, some are going on to be doctors or physical therapists,” he said. “They’re all different aspects of the health care industry, and that’s really what we’re looking to do.”
He added, “And they’re all good students; academically, they’re always stellar, but for me, sometimes, it’s about how much community involvement, the letter they write and the passion they bring into the situation.”
Crooks, who is planning to double major in psychology and business at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, was very excited to be selected.
“Given my majors, I didn’t know how they would view it, compared to somebody who’s going to be a doctor,” she said.
Crooks hopes to earn a doctorate in medical psychology; she wants to open her own practice and form a nonprofit organization that provides free counseling to people who affected by natural disasters.
“Not a lot of people pay attention to the mental damage that comes with an event like Hurricane Katrina; there’s so much structural damage, but we need to take time to help the people cope with what they just went through,” she explained.
Crooks’s career plans correspond with the intended outcome Graham has for the recipients.
“I like the concept of paying it forward; I like the idea of, hopefully, instilling in some of the students the idea that you can give back to the community,” he said. “That’s one of the goals, is to create that kind of philosophy.”
He added, “Obviously, they’re all going to do well in their fields, so I’m sure they’ll all be able, in some capacity, to do that.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2016 News Democrat