Bobby A Reed Harold L Barger Ralph M Gaither Stranded students rescued by Brown County cooperation 4-H Teen Ambassador Dunning attends SHOT Show Veterans Service Commission invites veterans to seek help with benefits Unemployment rate rises in Brown County Pick a Lollipop, help a dog A season to remember G-Men hit the field for first baseball scrimmage Eastern’s Rigdon, Purdy earn AP SE District Div. III honors New blocking, kicking rules address risk minimization in high school football Judy A Schneider James M Darnell Lawanda R Truesdell Paul E Grisham Arrelous R Rowland Dennis E Stivers David M Daniels Fayetteville man is charged with child porn April 1st Grand Opening for Jacob’s Ladder Resale Boutique in Georgetown Talent Show auditions at Gaslight Theatre Nine indicted by county grand jury Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall visit coming next May to BC Fairgrounds In it to win it! Bronco wrestlers end season on successful note Eastern’s Hopkins finishes 5th in long jump at OATCCC State Indoor Track and Field Meet SBAAC awards academic all-stars, winning teams Marvin D Atkin Beverly S Flatt Jessie M Sanders Leroy Deck Sr Jody A Towler Sherman E Young Kenneth C Burton Varnau’s face second defamation suit Attorney General to visit Georgetown schools Clermont County GOP hosts Wenstrup, DeWine at dinner Fatal car crash in Adams County BC Chamber welcomes new Cricket Wireless store to Mt. Orab Aberdeen Council approves 2017 budget Royce K Zimmerman Lady Warriors advance to Elite 8 SBAAC awards boys basketball all-stars SBAAC girls basketball all-stars take home awards SHAC Winter Sports Awards Banquet set for March 12 Altman claims 170-pound district title Sirkka L Buller Arthur C Schneider Lowell G Neal Virginia M Schirmer Connie S Darling Harold L Purdin Terry E Frye Lucille Schumacher Lady Warriors roll to district finals Broncos take care of business to claim sectional crown G-Men upset MVCA to earn berth sectional finals WBHS JROTC Rifle Team competes at Camp Perry Lady Rockets finish 12-12 Season reaches end for Rockets Eugene D Ring Two indicted on major drug charges Two charged with home invasion Cincinnati airport expanding services, lowering prices in effort to compete Two sentenced in common pleas court Georgetown man hurt in car crash Robert G Miller Linda M Howland Robert E McKinney Mildred J Hodges Farrel L Amiott Patricia Brown Rick L Dye Mary E Nagel Betty Ratliff Broncos claim SBAAC wrestling title Broncos pull ahead for win over G-Men in SBAAC Tourney Ripley boys wrap up regular season with win at Lynchburg Eastern girls are sectional champs Anderson pleads not guilty to battery charge Some county offices to change locations Fayetteville prepares for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall HealthSource hosts Chamber of Commerce meeting Five sentenced in Brown County Common Pleas Court June Howser Marguerite A Fender Timothy D Harris Jay R Purdy Robin S Godwin Marc A Wachter Chester W Eyre Warriors blast past the G-Men, 61-40 Rockets performing well heading into post-season tournament play Lady Warriors bring home the Gold with perfect 13-0 finish in SHAC Western Brown Junior High wrestling team wraps up successful season Rockets fall victim to ‘Pack’ attack Broncos suffer heartbreaking loss to Mentor Lake Catholic in state quarterfinals Adult Education Center coming to county ‘Senior Playground’ moving forward at Georgetown park

Wenninger answers tough questions about role as Sheriff

GEORGETOWN – With the primary election just a few weeks away there are four candidates vying for the Republican nomination for Sheriff of Brown County. The man who currently holds that position is Dwayne Wenninger. He is ready to retire but has faced a lot of criticism from residents in the County for the perceived lack of appearance while holding the office of Sheriff.

“I am here all the time,” Wenninger said. “Here is the other thing, they have talked about that for 16 years. But I come in and make sure the job is done. We run a fine well oiled machine. I put just as much time in as some of these other elected county officials. Is the sheriff here like they always got on me Monday through Friday from 8-4 and sit here 24 hours a day? No. I don’t care who is elected. They talk like ‘I’m going to be a full time Sheriff,’ you can sit here for 24 hours a day and sleep here and not get the job done.”

Wenninger said he takes a different approach to how to handle the duties as an elected official in Brown County. He said he doesn’t have to be in the office 24 hours a day, seven days a week to be an effective voice within the department.

“I run things a little differently,” Wenninger said. “I run it like a business. I have people underneath me that I feel can do they job and take care of certain things. I don’t micromanage. Some people do get a little jealous. I have been fairly successful over my career. Just because I do something part-time on the side, a lot of other county officials do things part-time on the side. I don’t blame anybody for bettering themselves. I feel like what I do on my own time is my time. But whenever there is a need I am in contact 24 hours a day, seven days a week. People call me, I answer questions. I come and go as what needs to be done. My police take care of it.”

Wenninger said that over his 16 years as Sheriff, the candidates who ran against him tried to use his working hours against him, but could not come up with other issues from one of the longest serving sheriffs in Brown County, ever.

“That is the only thing over the years they could try to gig me on,” Wenninger said. “Usually one term here, two terms you are gone. But I treat everybody fair in the county. I call an apple an apple and a spade a spade. I treat the public with respect and they have always re-voted me in.”

Wenninger said he invited anyone to visit any of Ohio’s 88 counties to see that a Sheriff does not work 24 hours per day and that he was thankful for the people who elected him over the years to serve as their Sheriff here in Brown County.

“The public was happy with what I did and how I did it,” Wenninger said. “I have 10 months left and I am retiring. That’s the point to, my chief deputy is running for sheriff and people have been asking him ‘are you going to hire the sheriff back,’ I put a thing out, no, I am retiring. I have other endeavors to pursue. If I wanted to stay I would have ran again but I am not interested.”

Wenninger said that even though he still enjoys his job as Sheriff, he thinks he has spent enough time leading the county’s law enforcement agency. He also said that over the last several years his job has become more and more difficult as more and more money is cut from the top down, at the state level, to counties and ultimately his department.

“It’s not the county’s fault, but numbers go down and the first place cut is the Sheriff’s office,” Wenninger said. “Three years ago I took a 10 percent cut and everyone was supposed to, but none of the courts got cut. None of the courthouses got cut.”

Wenninger said he felt the right thing for the county to have done would have been to cut the budget of the court system and force a judge to order the County Commissioners to fund their budget at the discretion of the judge.

“It would put the ball in their court and that is the way I feel,” Wenninger said. “I’ll cut but if you court order me you have to do it and that puts the ball in their court. But, were are the biggest budget and we get cut.”

The restraints the Sheriff has faced over the last several years in money is the key reason for him to not seek re-election. He said he is ready to retire to go back into his side business full time.

“I’ve done the best I can do with it and we’ve solved a lot of cases,” Wenninger said. “We’ve solved all our homicides and even some old existing cases, we still have the one left on 68 that I would love to solve before I get out. But I’ve solved ever major homicide and some old homicides since I’ve been around and I think we did rather well. I am still young enough, and I have other endeavors. I don’t need the stress and headaches of it and the politics of it. Some people not matter you do and how you, you can pass out hundred dollar bills and they’d still complain to you. I feel it’s time to let someone else have a chance at it. Maybe they can do better than what I have done.”

Dwayne Wenninger has 10 months remaining in office as Brown County Sheriff. He said he is ready to retire and work on other endeavors. He said he would help transition the new sheriff into office .
http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_IMG_0312.jpgDwayne Wenninger has 10 months remaining in office as Brown County Sheriff. He said he is ready to retire and work on other endeavors. He said he would help transition the new sheriff into office .
Answers the tough questions about his time on duty

By Brian Durham

bdurham@civitasmedia.com

Reach Brian Durham at 937-378-6161 or on Twitter @brianD1738.

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2016 News Democrat