Grandfather charged in boy’s death Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup

Cattle handling facilities cut stress

If you are in the cattle business I am sure you are well aware of the market, or at the very least you know it is not near what it was eight months ago, or a year ago. With the market not as strong, this may be the opportunity to try to capture a better price through improved marketing.

I have stated this in the past, but it never hurts repeating it when it may improve your bottom line. When you plan to sell your cattle, it is always a good part of the plan to be in contact with the people you trust will get you the best price. In other words contact the manager of the stockyards where you sell your livestock prior to opening the back door of the trailer to unload them at the yards. If the manager of the yards knows what animals you have, the number of them, the sex, the approximate weight, and what vaccination program you have administered they may have buyers looking for just what you have to sell. Call in advance and give the manager time to work a couple of weeks or a month in advance.

With that all said, the vaccination program might just become more of a tool to increase the value of your calves in a market that is not as strong as it was. Your stockyards manager and your veterinarian can both be good sources of information on this matter.

So, if you are now thinking that you may need to do more vaccinations, how are your facilities? Are they in good working order? Do you need to modify or change things to reduce the stress on both the animals and yourself? The following addresses some of the issues with facilities. It appeared in a recent beef blog and was written by Dr. Ken McMillan.

DTN/The Progressive Farmer Contributing Editor. The Beef Blog comes from Dr. Phil Reed from Purdue on a daily basis. If you would like for me to forward the beef blog to you, send me a request to dugan.46@osu.edu.

Question: We need to rework our corral and get a new chute. Do you have any suggestions? Who makes the best chutes?

Answer: Asking who makes the best cattle chute is sort of like asking who makes the best pickup truck. Want to start a fight? Start talking about religion, politics or pickups.

A lot of this is personal preference. I prefer scissor-type headcatches, but others prefer pivoting, self-catching types. I really like chutes that squeeze straight inward rather than in a V shape. I think cattle just seem to do better with a light, equal squeeze.

Chute size and weight must be matched with cattle size. Don’t buy more than you need, but be sure you get enough. There is nothing more stressful than trying to work large cattle in a chute that’s too small.

The most common design flaw I see in corrals is the lanes are too wide. While corrals that are adjustable with crowding alleys are ideal, they are expensive. If this is not an option, alleys 28 to 30 inches wide are enough for most cattle. If you have really large cattle, your alleys may need to be a little wider, but you may have a problem with calves turning around in them. Making alleys V-shaped can help with this, but when a cow or bull goes down, it can be difficult to get them up.

Alleys that gently curve take advantage of the natural tendency of cattle to circle, and solid walls also help keep cattle moving forward. A “crowding tub” with a crowding or sweep gate at least 12 feet long makes getting cattle into the chute much less stressful on man and beast.

GAP Training Opportunities

As I have announced earlier, the first GAP session for 2016 Tobacco Producers will be held 1 p.m. Feb. 25 in West Union at Frisch’s. You need to call Barbie at the Adams Co. Extension Office to register at 937-544-2339. There will also be a session in Maysville at the Maysville Community and Technical College 6 p.m. Feb. 25.

I have additional dates that will be posted in the next couple of days, and will be in this article next week. The dates will be in March, and it appears that I will be able to offer one in the morning, one in the afternoon and one in the evening to hopefully work around everyone’s work schedules. Please remember to call Barbie so we have space, as all locations have limited space.

Dates to Remember

Feb. 8 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at North Adams HS beginning 5 p.m. Pre-registration is required by Feb. 1 by calling 937-378-6716.

Feb. 18 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at Southern State Community College in Hillsboro beginning 10 a.m. Pre-registration required at 937-378-6716 by Feb. 12. Seating is limited.

Feb. 22 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at Southern Hills Board Office in Georgetown on Hamer Road beginning at 10 a.m. Pre-registration required by Feb. 16 at 937-378-6716. Ask for Cindy.

Feb. 25 GAP for tobacco producers will be held at Frisch’s in West Union at 1 p.m. Pre-registration required and seating is limited. Call Barbie at 937-544-2339.

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2016 News Democrat