Gene Warren Dwight L Fulton Virginia A O’Neil Anne L Durbin-Thomas Marietta Dunn Charles L Latchford Broncos win ‘Battle of 32’ Lady Broncos claim win over Bethel-Tate Jays top Warriors, fall to Mustangs Lady Warriors claim top spot in SHAC with win over Lynchburg-Clay Broncos buck the Lions, 54-51 James N DeHaas Questions still linger in Stuart explosion New direction for Brittany Stykes case New public safety director now on duty in Brown Co. Fayetteville Mayor anticipates a good year for the village Chamber of Commerce announces awardees Robert Bechdolt Carl E Lindsey Audrey F Maher LeJeune Howser Tammy L Connor Henry C Mayhall Jr Chad Spilker Frank W Kemmeter Jr Wanda J Howard Dorothy Huff Colon C Malott Eastern varsity teams come out on top to capture Brown County Holiday Classic crowns WBHS Army JROTC hosts rifle shooting competition Bronco varsity wrestling team unbeaten at 8-0 Blue Jays finish 1-1 in Ripley Pepsi Classic Mona G Van Vooren Hiram Beardsworth Avery W McCleese Ethel E Long Children learn safety from ‘Officer Phil’ Microchips can help locate lost pets Local GOP plans trip to Washington Three sentenced in common pleas Estel Earhart Roy Stewart Tenacious ‘D’ leads Lady Jays to victory over Blanchester on day one of Ripley Pepsi Classic Fayetteville’s Thompson, Jester earn SWOFCA All-City honors Jays fall to Blanchester on first day of Pepsi Classic Ticket details announced for OHSAA basketball and wrestling state tournaments Jerri K McKenzie Randy D Vaughn Georgetown JR/SR high to have new library Georgetown saw many improvements in 2016 Three sentenced in common pleas court Esther O Brown G-Men go on scoring rampage for 77-41 win over Cardinals Warriors climb to 4-2 with wins over West Union, Lynchburg Rockets top Whiteoak for first win Shirley M Bray Carter Lumber closes in G’town Wenstrup looks forward to 2017 Seven indicted by county grand jury John Ruthven holds pre-Christmas Open House New pet boarding facility now open in Georgetown Denver W Emmons Carl W Liebig Mary L McKinley Blake C Roush Louis A Koewler William D Cornetet Western Brown dedicates Perry Ogden Court Lady Warrior win streak hits 5 Lady Rockets wrap up tough week on the hardwood Barons rally for win over Broncos Georgetown to hire two paid Firefighter/EMT’s Noble receives statewide law enforcement award County helps family in need after house fire Flashing signs banned in G’town historic district ‘Christmas Extravaganza’ at Gaslight Thelma L Ernst Roy L Bruce Ken Leimberger Cathye J Bunthoff Lending a holiday helping hand G’Town Christmas Parade enjoyed by spectators Mt. Orab Auto Mall collects over 1,100 canned goods for local families “Celebration of Lights” held at fairgrounds Thirteen indicted by grand jury Lady Warriors hit the hardwood with high expectations Warriors reload after graduating four starters Six seniors hit the hardwood for Rockets Lady Rockets packed with size, talent Lady G-Men to rely heavily on young talent G-Men seek improvement after last year’s three-win season Skilled crew on the return for the Blue Jays Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. crown Lady Broncos working hard toward SBAAC American Div. title after finishing as league runner-up last season Experienced crew of Lady Jays return to the hardwood Stephen C Foster Mary J Fitzgerald Tyler Hesler Herbert Polley Robert Layton

Three stages of calving

For some, calving season is in full swing, but for many it is just around the corner. I thought this was a good refresher as we prepare for a very busy time for many cow/calf producers. This appeared last week in the Drover’s Cow/Calf email that I receive. It was written by Glenn Selk, a beef specialist from Oklahoma State.

Animal scientists and veterinarians agree that there are three important stages of any cow’s delivery of the baby calf. Understanding what to expect during the normal delivery can help to determine when a cow needs assistance due to a problem that occurs during calving.

Stage 1

The first stage of parturition is dilation of the cervix. The normal cervix is tightly closed right up until the cervical plug is completely dissolved. In stage 1, cervical dilation begins some four to 24 hours before the completion of parturition. During this time the “progesterone block” is no longer present and the uterine muscles are becoming more sensitive to all factors that increase the rate and strength of contractions. At the beginning, the contractile forces primarily influence the relaxation of the cervix but uterine muscular activity is still rather quiet. Stage 1 is likely to go completely unnoticed, but there may be some behavioral differences such as isolation or discomfort. At the end of stage one, there may be some noticeable behavioral changes such as elevation of the tail, switching of the tail and increased mucous discharge.

Stage 2

The second stage of parturition is defined as the delivery of the newborn. It begins with the entrance of the membranes and fetus into the pelvic canal and ends with the completed birth of the calf. So the second stage is the one in which we really are interested. This is where all the action is. Clinically, and from a practical aspect we would define the beginning of stage 2 as the appearance of membranes or water bag at the vulva. The traditional texts, fact sheets, magazines, and other publications that we read may state that Stage 2 in cattle lasts from two to four hours.

However, data from Oklahoma State University (Putnam, et al. 1985) and the USDA experiment station at Miles City, Montana (Doornbos, et al. 1984), would indicate that Stage 2 is much shorter being approximately one hour for heifers and 30 minutes for adult cows. In these studies, assistance was given if Stage 2 progressed more than two hours after the appearance of water bag at the vulva. The interesting thing about the data was that heifers calving unassisted did so in an average time of about 55 minutes after the initiation of Stage 2 and adult cows did so within about 22 minutes of the initiation of Stage 2. Those that took longer needed assistance. These and other data would indicate that normal Stage 2 of parturition should be redefined as approximately one hour for heifers and 30 minutes for cows. In heifers, not only is the pelvic opening smaller, but also the soft tissue has never been expanded. Older cows have had deliveries in previous years and birth should go quite rapidly unless there is some abnormality such as a very large calf, backwards calf, leg back or twins.

Stage 3

The third stage of parturition is the shedding of the placenta or fetal membranes. In cattle this normally occurs in less than eight-12 hours. The membranes are considered retained if after 12 hours they have not been shed. Years ago it was considered necessary to remove the membranes by manually “unbuttoning” the attachments. However, research has shown that improper manual removal can be detrimental to uterine health and future conception rates. Administration of antibiotics usually will guard against infection and the placenta will slough out in four-seven days. Contact your veterinarian for the proper management of a retained placenta. Before the spring calving season begins, download and read Calving Time Management for Beef Cows and Heifers (Oklahoma State University E-1006).

Ohio Power Show

This marks year 46 for the Ohio Power Show. The Power Show will be held on Jan. 28, 29 and 30 at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus. The cost is $10 per carload and that includes parking. Tickets are available at the OSU Extension Offices for a $2 discount. Stop by and pick one up.

Dates to Remember

Feb. 2 Fruit, Vegetable and Specialty Crop Conference at 9:15 a.m. at the Oasis in Loveland. More information and registration http://go.osu.edu/swohfvsc

Feb. 3 Ohio River Valley Agronomy Day in Maysville, Ky. at the Mason Co. Extension Office. Program begins 9 a.m. RSVP by Feb. 1 at 606-564-6808.

Feb. 8 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at North Adams HS beginning 5 p.m. Pre-registration is required by Feb. 1 at 378-6716.

Feb. 18 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at Southern State Community College in Hillsboro beginning 10 a.m. Pre-registration required at 937-378-6716 by Feb. 12. Seating is limited.

Feb. 22 Two hour Fertilizer and three hour Private Pesticide Re-certification at Southern Hills Board Office in Georgetown on Hamer Road beginning 10 a.m. Pre-registration required by Feb. 16 at 937-378-6716. Ask for Cindy.

Feb. 25 GAP for tobacco producers will be held at Frisch’s in West Union at 1 p.m. Pre-registration required and seating is limited. Call Barbie at 937-544-2339.

http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Dugan-sig-1.pdf

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