Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia

Treat drug epidemic like a public health crisis, not a criminal witch-hunt

I’m not much of a column writer, but when something piques my interests I like to sound off on a topic, so here it goes. Love him or hate him the President of the United States issued his final State of Union Address this past week. I found the most interesting part to be that he called for help in solving the heroin and prescription pain killer epidemic. Rarely does a President mention something people often try to sweep under the rug as part of their speech to address the entire nation. I think it’s time that we as a country start treating heroin and pain killer abuse as a public health crisis and get the problem under control.

The last major public health crisis that comes to mind for me was in the 1980s when HIV/AIDS swept through the nation. Initially those who contracted the disease were treated poorly, called derogatory names, and treated as if they were the victim of their own action and not face it as a public health issue. Then it all changed when the virus spread to people not associated with the derogatory name and into communities where it had not been a problem before and we did something about it. We treated it like a public health crisis and have helped curb the spread of HIV/AIDS and helped those who live with the disease live longer, normal lives. Three pills a day is all it takes now to help someone with HIV/AIDS live a normal life. I think it’s fine time to do the same for those who struggle with addiction.

Looking at this county alone, I would venture to say 80 to 90 percent of all crimes are a result directly or indirectly from drug use. People end up behind bars for possession of substances, possession needles, having chemicals to manufacture meth or everything in between. Then we have another large population of those behind bars who are in jail for property crimes and theft. Each and every week I read through the indictments from the Grand Jury and get sick to my stomach at the number of people with multiple thefts and burglaries followed by a final count of an indictment that includes trafficking in heroin or possession of chemicals for assembly/manufacturing of drugs.

I don’t think the answer is to lock non-violent people in cages with violent criminals and hope they come out ‘cured’ of their drug use. That seems a bit ridiculous. Jails are overcrowded with petty drug criminals and it leaves little to no room for violent offenders. I am a firm believer that no one starts using drugs because they say to themselves, “Hey, I’d like to shoot some heroin.” Drugs are an effect, not a cause. I think expanding care for mental health and wellness is a start. I think ending the stigma attached with mental health and wellness is a better start than even expanding the care.

We have a public health crisis, not a drug problem. Until we as a group of people address it like one, we will continue to pour money into fighting something not worth fighting. It doesn’t matter how many users, abusers, and traffickers we take off the streets because a new person with the same or better product is ready to step in and take their spot.

Let us start fighting the problem at the core through health and wellness and not through county jails and prisons.

Brian Durham
http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_DSC_90421.jpgBrian Durham

By Brian Durham

bdurham@civitasmedia.com

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2016 News Democrat