Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia

Dream lives on in wake of tragedy

In the wake of tragedy, a life can be turned upside down and changed forever. Sometimes, through that tragedy, a person’s dream takes on new life and grows into something bigger. Dusty Faul, father of Tyler Faul, lost his son in an auto accident on corner of US 68 and state Route 125 on June 19, but in his death, Tyler Faul’s passion and goals of opening the Ripley Gourmet Tortilla Factory took on new life.

One evening when Tyler and his brother were working in the Village of Georgetown through a summer youth program they met a man whose tire had blown out and volunteered their father, Dusty, to help with the tire. The man with the car trouble was Syl Flores.

Faul said he listened to Flores talk about the idea of a tortilla factory with skepticism.

“You hear people all the time say ‘I’m going to do this or start that,’” Faul said. “I just sat and let him talk while he made it home, but it sort of became the kid’s pet project.”

Faul said he wasn’t involved early on in the tortilla factory, but said it gave an opportunity for his kids to learn responsibility and gain skills working with Flores. Although he was skeptical the idea would come to fruition, he thought the learning experience would be invaluable for life experience.

“I looked at as something I never got to do when I was young,” Faul said. “I wish I had gotten the opportunity to start something like this.”

Faul did not realize how involved his son had gotten in the Ripley Gourmet Tortilla Factory until after his death. After Tyler Faul had passed, Dusty Faul said he went into his room and found a collection of work for the tortilla factory.

“The way it kind of happened, after he passed I was dealing a lot with that, plus I had another son who was injured and deal with getting him (Tyler) buried and my son in the hospital wanted to be there,” Faul said, “but afterward , when things started to settle in I was over at the house in Tyler’s room and he had boxes and papers everywhere. I started to realize how much this tortilla factory meant to him. This was his dream. Tyler done his homework. He wrote the handbook for the tortilla factory. I got on his laptop and the research he had done on other factories – his notes of ideas and if it were bad he marked it out and wrote bad but he’d keep it. After going through all that, I told my fiance, I’ve got to do something. I’ve got to step up to the plate and that is when we stepped in. Tyler was all about being heard. He had a saying ‘you could be one man, you might not be a powerful man, but you can be heard.’”

Dusty Faul said his knew his son’s dedication to getting the project off the ground, but more importantly, he said now the goal in continuing his son’s legacy is to work with youth in the community to improve conditions of poverty and joblessness.

“This about the kids, this isn’t about us,” Dusty Faul said. “It’s about those in poverty and giving them something to work for. It’s about getting kids off drugs and giving them a job and an opportunity. A lot of parents are set in their ways and don’t have much money but this can change that.”

After over two years of work, the Ripley Gourmet Tortilla Factory opened its doors to the public. Working with A Future Without Poverty, Faul never thought he would be this deep into something, but said he knew it was the right thing to do.

Tyler Faul had many goals during his life time that he will never be able to achieve because his life was cut tragically short, but Dusty Faul said even in his son’s absence, he is still making an impact through all those working hard to help make the business thrive.

Through the hard work of those involved in the factory, new doors have opened and others are being opened. Dusty Faul said he hoped soon to not only be selling to the public, but in stores in the area and regionally.

He said things are in the works to get the tortilla is major stores as well as local restaurants. He said hope to grow the garden where most of the ingredients for the tortilla comes from by using greenhouses and being able to grown year round to keep things local, but said buy things like tomatoes off local growers might be in the future plans.

While Tyler Faul may have lost his life in June, his vision is starting to impact the lives of those in poverty in southern Brown County. While Flores works on funding, Dusty Faul and his family are working on making sure operations run smooth and soundly.

Visiting Main Street in Ripley, someone now can stop in purchase a delicious spinach or tomato basil wrap with locally grown ingredients from local manufacturers. Tyler Faul’s goal of being heard is starting to take off.

The Ripley Gourmet Tortilla Factory became what would become the life work of Tyler Faul. In wake tragically losing his life, his family has continued his mission to build the tortilla factory.
http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_IMG_9890.jpgThe Ripley Gourmet Tortilla Factory became what would become the life work of Tyler Faul. In wake tragically losing his life, his family has continued his mission to build the tortilla factory.

By Brian Durham

bdurham@civitasmedia.co

Reach Brian Durham at 937-378-6161 or on Twitter @brianD1738.

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2016 News Democrat