Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia Broncos buck Clinton-Massie, Goshen James H Boyd Warren A Stanley Jane R Ernst Darrell F Anderson

A case for American leadership in the War on Terrorism

When the US does not lead in global national security issues, a vacuum occurs, and that usually results in chaos. I believe we are seeing that now with the rise of radical Islamic extremism. It is time for us to lead in the effort to defeat ISIS and other terrorist groups.

President Obama has suggested that the terrorist threat is overblown. I believe the threat is very real, and it is past time we face it head on. It was just last month when ISIS terrorists killed 130 innocent people in a series of very well-coordinated attacks in Paris. These attacks did not occur in isolation. They were but one of a series of attacks that occurred within a 24-hour period. In that same time period, attacks left 43 people dead in Beirut, 18 dead in Baghdad, countless wounded — all ISIS attacks. In the preceding month, ISIS took credit for the downing of a Russian airplane claiming the lives of 224 innocent civilians. In September, Islamic extremists murdered nearly 50 in Yemen. In fact, if you look back over the period of the past year, several hundred civilians have been killed in nearly 30 attacks around the world. The threat is real.

Of course, earlier this month, we saw that when we were attacked here at home. In the worst terror attack in the United States since 9/11, the attack in San Bernardino reminded us that the threat posed by Islamic extremism can be home-grown or global.

These attacks should serve as a wake-up call, not only about the nature of the enemy we face in ISIS, but about the chaotic and dangerous state of the world today and the need for more determined American leadership to address it. Unfortunately, ISIS is not “contained”, and the attacks in Paris were not a “setback”, as the President has said. These attacks were a tragedy, one of a series of attacks, and a warning.

We cannot develop a successful strategy to defeat ISIS unless we understand its true nature. In my view, downplaying the Islamic extremist threat and viewing each tragedy in isolation is a fundamental flaw in the Administration’s national security policy.

ISIS is not just a nuisance to be managed; it is a global threat to be defeated. The territory ISIS holds has served as an incubator for radicalization and provides a safe haven for these terrorists to train, organize, gather resources, and project power. Tens of thousands of foreign fighters from Europe, the U.S., and around the world have flocked to the front lines of the global jihad, and some return home with the training and resources that have the potential to result in monstrous attacks. Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing atrocities and persecution in Syria have provided ISIS operatives a potential means to get access to other countries.

The Syrian refugee crisis is exhibit A of the chaos that emerges in a world without American leadership. As a member of the Homeland Security Committee, I recently questioned Administration officials on what steps are being taken to ensure terrorists do not exploit our Syrian refugee resettlement program and I have called for a thorough review of Department of Homeland Security and State Department vetting procedures to ensure that no terrorists or individuals with links to Islamist extremist groups make it into the United States.

n addition to better protecting the homeland by keeping people out who want to do us harm, the United States should also increase the scale and intensity of military operations against ISIS targets, and, through the use of U.S. Special Operations forces and local allies, defeat ISIS forces on the ground and retake lost territory. As I’ve argued for over two years now, we cannot ignore the broader conflict in Syria and must lead our allies in pursuing a comprehensive strategy to not only defeat ISIS but also achieve a negotiated resolution of the Syrian conflict. Military force alone will not solve it, but it can shape the parameters of an acceptable solution.

I was glad to be able to help our troops with the resources they need to stay safe and protect us in the recently passed National Defense Authorization Act. Now is the time for all of us to stand by our troops, to reverse defense cuts and ensure our brave men and women in uniform have the best equipment, technology and training in the world.

It is a world where the very structure of international order is under siege and where the direction of our collective future is brought into question we can not afford to “lead from behind”, as the Obama Administration itself has described its approach. “Peace through strength” works better. We must be unwavering in our support to our allies, and we must be clear-eyed and resolute in standing up to our foes. That is the path to peace and security.

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2016 News Democrat