Georgia E Smith Jonathan C Gee Wenstrup discusses regulations, drug issue Woman charged with injecting pregnant woman Public meeting on drug problem draws large crowd BC Chamber of Commerce looks for nominees Mary A Brauns Lynn V Augline Denise A McCleese Tommy E Vaughn Beulah M White Anthony Dozier Moore sentenced to 16 years in prison for assault Tea Party holds candidate forum Hamersville Police Dept. introduces newest officer Russellville Council takes action on closing alleys Anthony R Traylor Caryl J Eyre Jays clinch 2nd in SHAC Division I Week 7 football roundup Battle between Eastern, Ripley ends in tie Broncos are SBAAC American Divison champs Lady Rockets enter final game of regular season on 3-game win streak Lady G-Men claim wins over Manchester, Bethel-Tate Lady Broncos win at New Richmond, rise to first in SBAAC American Division standings Judge approves sale of hospital Trump losing support in Ohio delegation Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Joyce A Mignerey George W Kilgore Vernon Creighton Brittany A Perkins Sister Jane Stier Jeff Bess Russell Rockwell Lady Warriors looking to get back to winning ways G-Men rise to 2nd in SBAAC Nat’l Division Western Brown volleyball team jumps to 12-6 with wins over Norwood, CNE Week six football roundup Track champions determined at MRP in an exciting night of racing action Sectional tourney play begins for Western Brown girls tennis Phillips, Sininger advance to district golf tourney Christopher W Baker Sherry A Napier Betty L Kelley Virginia E Deininger Shirley J Carr 2016 Brown County Fair comes to an end Coroner appeals ruling on Goldson investigation Ripley Federal merges with Southern Hills RUCK March set to raise veteran suicide awareness Louise I McCann Louise I McCann Jackie Garrison Kathy S Jordan Rockets rally for first league win Lady Broncos rise to 10-6 with win at Wilmington Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. title Lady G-Men looking to bounce back from recent losses SHAC golf season in the books Lady Rockets top Whiteoak Fair Royalty chosen for 2016 Troop Box Ministry still going strong after 15 years Three sentenced in Common Pleas Alex K Miller Denvil Burchell Maneva H Teague Vincent A Cluxton Stanley J Brannock Robert L Dyer Mary L Phillips Broncos gallop to 9-0-1 with win over G-Men Tight battle continues for SBAAC American Division volleyball title Jays rally for win over Rockets Week 4 football roundup Sininger is SBAAC Nat’l Division Golfer of Year Lady Rockets top CCD, fall to CNE Janet R Reveal Paul D Hines Gas skimmers stealing identities Democrats meet in G’town Humane Society horses now up for adoption New ‘B-Fit Program’ at this year’s fair Drug Task Force marijuana eradication Cheryl L Sams Aaron S Cartwright Tommie E Stout Rockets soar past the Warriors, 5-0 G-Men place runner-up in Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady Warriors cruise to victory over Fayetteville Broncos remain unbeaten at 6-0-1 Lady G-Men win at Ripley Week 3 football roundup Broncos lead after round two of SBAAC American Division play Ohana Music Festival a huge success Man charged with 292 counts of child porn possession G’Town Council resolves zoning issues, to hold public meeting on medical marijuana Chase pleads guilty to obscenity charges Georgetown Nativity Scene to be on display, much longer this year Georgetown Police Chief Rob Freeland, updates council on village happenings

Take a picture, it’ll last longer

I have written many times about our farm which was appropriately named Pine Acre Farm. This was the farm where I was born , raised and grew up. This was a farm that from all accounts had in the depression not been cared for and almost all the good top soil had eroded away. I guess that was why Dad bought it for a very low price. He then spent half his life building this farm back to not just a farm with top soil, but a farm that grew profitable crops every year. It was a farm with good buildings and a home in good condition and fences that Dad kept looking good. Dad and Mom and their three kids all knew just how much time, money, and labor had gone into making it more than just a farm. It was a farm that people pointed to and said “it would be nice to have a place like Ralph has.”

It wasn’t the place to display in the beginning but work and planning helped turn it into a good farm. One evening in the fall of 1962 a knock came on our door. Mom answered because Dad was away at a trustee meeting. There was a man at the door with a large looking photo album and a black carrying case. He introduced himself and handed Mom a business card as he explained he was a representative from the State Aerial Farm Statistics, Mapping Division out of Toledo.

In the previous months a plane had flown over and taken photos of our farm and he wanted to show them to us. This definitely grabbed our attention and curiosity. Mom invited him in and we all sat with him as he showed us pictures of our farm and explained what he was about to offer. He had a 5”x8” black and white picture of our farm that was pin point clear. That picture cost a dollar. However, we could own a 15’’x19’ full color portrait, hand painted and framed in a wooden frame with the wood of our choosing for only $60.

This was 1962 and $60 was a larger sum than it is today. Mom listened and studied that picture. I don’t know about now but at that time traveling salesmen didn’t carry a high pedigree at all. My Mom was a very frugal and a hard person to get a dollar out of, especially a stranger who she had not seen until maybe 15 minutes before he knocked on our door. To this day I still don’t really know why but my Mom said “I will take it.” He wrote up the order and they picked out pine wood for the frame (as it was Pine Acre Farm) and Mom wrote him the check.

All seemed well and Mom was happy with the deal until Dad came home. When she told Dad about our company and the transaction. Dad became very upset and for the first time and maybe the only time I witnessed my parents in an argument. Dad’s reason was that our visitor was a peddler from clear over in Toledo and he was positive we would never see a farm portrait or the $60. Mom argued back that she had checked his credentials and she just knew he was honest. This conversation continued for days and then weeks but always when we were out of hearing range because arguing in front of us was very bad.

About six weeks passed by and one evening a knock came at the door and there stood the salesman. Dad said he would go to the door. (By the way, Mom accompanied Dad). There stood the salesman with the portrait under his arm. He was invited in and offered a seat and in front of us all unwrapped the infamous photo. Dad wouldn’t admit it at that time but he immediately fell in love with that picture. So did we all. To keep his pride, he pointed out a couple of tiny flaws and the salesman assured Dad it would be corrected and returned in a week. What Mom saw in the picture was our farm looking at the very best it could look. She couldn’t express that to my Dad but she could see it all, even the huge amounts of labor that she and Dad had put into the farm.

Over the years many people have invested in an aerial photo of their farm or residence and display them with the pride in which they were designed to do. The remainder of my Dad’s life he kept that photo in close proximity. If a visitor made a comment about it, Dad would beam from ear to ear and tell of our farm on Fruit Ridge Road. He and Mom took that farm from the verge of forever lost to a majestic farm suitable to be painted in color and framed for viewing.

As a matter of fact when I look up from this keyboard I look right at the photo and I see a time and place that I will always look upon with happiness. Thanks Mom!

Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and likes to share stories about his youth and other topics. He may be reached at

The Good Old Days

Rick Houser

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