Eastern XC teams head to Regional Meet A season to remember Lady Warriors finish runner-up in SHAC Div. I Lady Broncos finish season 10-8-1 Week 9 football roundup G-Men and Colwell head to Div. III Regional XC Meet Marie E Thompson Georgia E Smith Jonathan C Gee Wenstrup discusses regulations, drug issue Woman charged with injecting pregnant woman Public meeting on drug problem draws large crowd BC Chamber of Commerce looks for nominees Mary A Brauns Lynn V Augline Denise A McCleese Tommy E Vaughn Beulah M White Anthony Dozier Moore sentenced to 16 years in prison for assault Tea Party holds candidate forum Hamersville Police Dept. introduces newest officer Russellville Council takes action on closing alleys Anthony R Traylor Caryl J Eyre Jays clinch 2nd in SHAC Division I Week 7 football roundup Battle between Eastern, Ripley ends in tie Broncos are SBAAC American Divison champs Lady Rockets enter final game of regular season on 3-game win streak Lady G-Men claim wins over Manchester, Bethel-Tate Lady Broncos win at New Richmond, rise to first in SBAAC American Division standings Judge approves sale of hospital Trump losing support in Ohio delegation Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Joyce A Mignerey George W Kilgore Vernon Creighton Brittany A Perkins Sister Jane Stier Jeff Bess Russell Rockwell Lady Warriors looking to get back to winning ways G-Men rise to 2nd in SBAAC Nat’l Division Western Brown volleyball team jumps to 12-6 with wins over Norwood, CNE Week six football roundup Track champions determined at MRP in an exciting night of racing action Sectional tourney play begins for Western Brown girls tennis Phillips, Sininger advance to district golf tourney Christopher W Baker Sherry A Napier Betty L Kelley Virginia E Deininger Shirley J Carr 2016 Brown County Fair comes to an end Coroner appeals ruling on Goldson investigation Ripley Federal merges with Southern Hills RUCK March set to raise veteran suicide awareness Louise I McCann Louise I McCann Jackie Garrison Kathy S Jordan Rockets rally for first league win Lady Broncos rise to 10-6 with win at Wilmington Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. title Lady G-Men looking to bounce back from recent losses SHAC golf season in the books Lady Rockets top Whiteoak Fair Royalty chosen for 2016 Troop Box Ministry still going strong after 15 years Three sentenced in Common Pleas Alex K Miller Denvil Burchell Maneva H Teague Vincent A Cluxton Stanley J Brannock Robert L Dyer Mary L Phillips Broncos gallop to 9-0-1 with win over G-Men Tight battle continues for SBAAC American Division volleyball title Jays rally for win over Rockets Week 4 football roundup Sininger is SBAAC Nat’l Division Golfer of Year Lady Rockets top CCD, fall to CNE Janet R Reveal Paul D Hines Gas skimmers stealing identities Democrats meet in G’town Humane Society horses now up for adoption New ‘B-Fit Program’ at this year’s fair Drug Task Force marijuana eradication Cheryl L Sams Aaron S Cartwright Tommie E Stout Rockets soar past the Warriors, 5-0 G-Men place runner-up in Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady Warriors cruise to victory over Fayetteville Broncos remain unbeaten at 6-0-1 Lady G-Men win at Ripley Week 3 football roundup

Several sports stars have answered the call

As Americans all around the country honor the veterans who have served and kept the country free, it’s becoming easier and easier to notice just how intertwined the military and sports have in fact become.

Obviously, the National Anthem is played before a vast majority of competitions at levels ranging from pee-wee all the way to the pros. There are pre-game flyovers at major sporting events, like the Super Bowl and Major League Baseball’s All-Star game, and NASCAR is one prominent sporting organization who routinely invites service academies to sing the national anthem.

Patriotism is not limited to the giant sporting leagues, however. Minor league baseball teams honor veterans, either on-field or over a public address announcement. High schools across the country host Veteran’s Day assemblies in the gymnasium.

Yet, sometimes, it even goes a step further than that. Look no further than Cincinnati’s own Roger Staubach.

Staubach was born in the Queen City and attended high school at Purcell Marian. Upon graduation, he enrolled at the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell, New Mexico, but he only stayed one season.

In 1961, Staubach joined the Naval Academy. He did not start for the Midshipmen immediately, and his first taste of gridiron action was, shall we say, less than successful. He went 0-f0r-2 on his passing attempts and was sacked twice, losing 24 yards.

One week later, however, he came into the game against Cornell and led his squad to six touchdowns, three of which he himself was responsible for, and his team blew out the Big Red 41-0.

That sparked a career that would see Staubach throw for over 3,500 yards and, eventually, an induction into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Before any of that, however, Staubach had an even bigger task ahead of him. During his junior year, he was declared color blind, which necessitated his joining of the Supply Corps. Upon graduation, instead of requesting an assignment in the United States, Staubach chose to go to Vietnam, where he served one year at the Chu Lai base.

While he was on duty, Staubach was drafted by both the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Draft and the Kansas City Chiefs of the American Football League Draft. He would join the Cowboys in 1969 and, after sitting out the first year or so of his career, led the Cowboys to 10 straight wins, including a Super Bowl title.

There are so many stories like Staubach, so many athletes who have either delayed or, in the case of Ted Williams, paused professional careers to join the military. Williams won the Triple Crown in 1942, then joined the Navy in 1943. He served three years before being recalled at 33 years old to fight in the Korean War, where he flew 39 combat missions.

Not every example has to be from the early 20th century, however. Look no further than former Arizona Cardinal safety Pat Tillman. Tillman enlisted in 2002 and was killed in a friendly fire incident in Afghanistan two years later.

Former Denver Broncos running back Mike Anderson served four years in the Marines after high school before a junior college coach noticed him and convinced him to attend the school. After two years, Anderson headed to Utah where he would set the career record for rushing yards per game (102.4). In 2000, he earned the NFL’s Offensive Rookie of the Year award after gaining 1,487 yards.

There are many, many more examples of athletes who stepped up exactly like the four above players did. Talking about all of them would fill up more newspapers than I’d even want to think about.

But their stories are made famous by what they did on the field, and there are many more people who make the decision to enroll in any of the branches of military, yet those people don’t always get the recognition they deserve. Maybe it’s because they would rather not relive it, maybe it’s because they just aren’t the kind of people who go out looking for attention.

So, as we honor the men and woman who have answered the call, regardless of their athletic prowess, there is only one thing left to do: Thank a veteran.


Garth Shanklin

Sports Editor

Reach Garth Shanklin at 937-378-6161 or follow him on Twitter @GNDShanklin. You may also send any email inquiries to gshanklin@civitasmedia.com.

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