Broncos trample the G-Men, 73-40 Rockets down the Devils, 59-55 Seven new inductees to enter WBHS Sports Hall of Fame Lady Warriors ascend to 13-1 Broncos finish 2nd of 22 teams in Hammer and Anvil Invitational Hedwig Lambert Billie G Walkup Some county offices may be moved G’town Council approves 2017 budget Family doubles in size with adoption Sardinia Mayor looks forward to 2017 2017 Fayetteville Firemen’s Festival set Floyd Newberry Jr Donna F Lang Gene Warren Dwight L Fulton Virginia A O’Neil Anne L Durbin-Thomas Marietta Dunn Charles L Latchford Broncos win ‘Battle of 32’ Lady Broncos claim win over Bethel-Tate Jays top Warriors, fall to Mustangs Lady Warriors claim top spot in SHAC with win over Lynchburg-Clay Broncos buck the Lions, 54-51 James N DeHaas Questions still linger in Stuart explosion New direction for Brittany Stykes case New public safety director now on duty in Brown Co. Fayetteville Mayor anticipates a good year for the village Chamber of Commerce announces awardees Robert Bechdolt Carl E Lindsey Audrey F Maher LeJeune Howser Tammy L Connor Henry C Mayhall Jr Chad Spilker Frank W Kemmeter Jr Wanda J Howard Dorothy Huff Colon C Malott Eastern varsity teams come out on top to capture Brown County Holiday Classic crowns WBHS Army JROTC hosts rifle shooting competition Bronco varsity wrestling team unbeaten at 8-0 Blue Jays finish 1-1 in Ripley Pepsi Classic Mona G Van Vooren Hiram Beardsworth Avery W McCleese Ethel E Long Children learn safety from ‘Officer Phil’ Microchips can help locate lost pets Local GOP plans trip to Washington Three sentenced in common pleas Estel Earhart Roy Stewart Tenacious ‘D’ leads Lady Jays to victory over Blanchester on day one of Ripley Pepsi Classic Fayetteville’s Thompson, Jester earn SWOFCA All-City honors Jays fall to Blanchester on first day of Pepsi Classic Ticket details announced for OHSAA basketball and wrestling state tournaments Jerri K McKenzie Randy D Vaughn Georgetown JR/SR high to have new library Georgetown saw many improvements in 2016 Three sentenced in common pleas court Esther O Brown G-Men go on scoring rampage for 77-41 win over Cardinals Warriors climb to 4-2 with wins over West Union, Lynchburg Rockets top Whiteoak for first win Shirley M Bray Carter Lumber closes in G’town Wenstrup looks forward to 2017 Seven indicted by county grand jury John Ruthven holds pre-Christmas Open House New pet boarding facility now open in Georgetown Denver W Emmons Carl W Liebig Mary L McKinley Blake C Roush Louis A Koewler William D Cornetet Western Brown dedicates Perry Ogden Court Lady Warrior win streak hits 5 Lady Rockets wrap up tough week on the hardwood Barons rally for win over Broncos Georgetown to hire two paid Firefighter/EMT’s Noble receives statewide law enforcement award County helps family in need after house fire Flashing signs banned in G’town historic district ‘Christmas Extravaganza’ at Gaslight Thelma L Ernst Roy L Bruce Ken Leimberger Cathye J Bunthoff Lending a holiday helping hand G’Town Christmas Parade enjoyed by spectators Mt. Orab Auto Mall collects over 1,100 canned goods for local families “Celebration of Lights” held at fairgrounds Thirteen indicted by grand jury Lady Warriors hit the hardwood with high expectations

Marijuana amendment defeated

By Daniel Karell

dkarell@civitasmedia.com

The citizens of Ohio sent a resounding no to marijuana legalization on election night.

As of press time, with nearly 70 percent of precincts reporting in the state, issue three, which would have legalized marijuana and effectively created a monopoly on growing and selling sites, lost by a nearly 30 percent margin, 65 to 35, according to the Ohio Secretary of State’s website. The website states that issue three received 819,949 yes votes and 1,515,981 no votes.

Interestingly, the precincts reporting across the state show that issue two, which protects the initiative process from creating a monopoly, passed, but only by around a 52 to 48 margin.

In Brown County, issue three was defeated by a nearly 59 to 41 margin, with 7,051 voting no and 4,944 voting yes.

In response to successful ballot box amendments to decriminalize marijuana in four U.S. states – Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and Colorado – the Political Action Committee Responsible Ohio petitioned to place Issue three on this November’s ballot.

The legalization amendment overcame numerous hurdles, including initial rejections on petition language from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and an investigation into legal signatures collected on the petition by Ohio Secretary of State John Husted. But eventually, it was approved to be on the ballot.

If it’s passed, issue three would allow the limited sale and possession of marijuana to those 21-years or older, both recreationally and medicinally. But different from the other states where amendments passed, issue three calls for the creation of ten growing sites in ten Ohio counties, where all of the state’s marijuana crop will be sold and distributed from.

The ten pre-determined sites are co-owned by some famous individuals, including former 98 Degrees front-man Nick Lachey and former University of Cincinnati and NBA star Oscar Robertson. The ten sites are located in Clermont, Hamilton, Butler, Licking, Lorain, Lucas, Delaware, Summit, Franklin, and Stark Counties.

The facilities are called marijuana growth, cultivation and extraction facilities (MGCEs), and they have exclusive rights to commercial production of marijuana, and it’s for this reason that there has been plenty of opposition to the amendment. While many opponents don’t want to see marijuana legalized at all, even more are against what they’re calling a “marijuana monopoly.”

By having only ten sites to grow and distribute marijuana for sale statewide, and writing into law that marijuana retailers can only sell marijuana from those sites, opponents believe that they would be codifying a monopoly, or oligopoly.

The opponents therefore quickly put on the ballot a counter-measure, issue two, which would prohibit monopolies being formed through ballot measures. To use the wording on the referendum, it states that’s an anti-monopoly amendment that “protects the initiative process from being used for personal economic benefit.”

The first line of the measure states, “prohibit any petitioner from using the Ohio Constitution to grant a monopoly, oligopoly, or cartel for their exclusive financial benefit or to establish a preferential tax status,” which is clearly a jab at issue three.

Opponents of issue three include the likes of Governor John Kasich, DeWine, Auditor of State Ned Yost, the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, and the Ohio Manufactures Association.

Locally, Brown County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Carl Smith has come out in opposition to issue three.

Supporters include former Ohio Senate Minority Leader Eric Kearney, and former Cincinnati Police Chief Tom Streicher.

Opponents of issue three have asked for voters to vote yes on issue two and no on issue three, with issue three supporters asking voters to do the opposite.

Reading the fine print, if issue three is passed, anyone 21 years of age or older can “grow, cultivate, use, possess, and share up to eight ounces of usable homegrown marijuana plus four flowering marijuana plants” if they acquire a valid state marijuana license, similar to a person acquiring a hunting license.

In addition, anyone 21 years of age or older may “purchase, possess, transport, use, or share” up to one ounce of marijuana. It’s not included in the ballot measure, but those caught with more than one ounce of marijuana without a license are still subject to local and state laws.

Medical marijuana would also be authorized by the passage of this measure.

In terms of purchasing retail marijuana, the revenue earned would be taxed at a flat rate of 15 percent, with a special five percent tax placed on each retail store’s revenue.

The measure would also apply limits on governmental regulation of the measure.

Two bullets state that if passed, the measure would “prohibit any local or state law, including zoning laws, from being applied to prohibit the development or operation of marijuana growth, cultivation, and extraction facilities, retail marijuana stores, and medical marijuana dispensaries” unless those areas are zoned residential as of Jan. 1, 2015, and “limit the ability of the legislature and local governments from regulating the manufacture, sales, distribution, and use of marijuana and marijuana products.”

If passed, issue three would go into effect on December 3, 30 days after the election. If issue two passes, it would go into effect immediately.

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By Daniel Karell

dkarell@civitasmedia.com

Reach Daniel Karell at 937-378-6161. Follow him on Twitter @GNDKarell

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2016 News Democrat