Stranded students rescued by Brown County cooperation 4-H Teen Ambassador Dunning attends SHOT Show Veterans Service Commission invites veterans to seek help with benefits Unemployment rate rises in Brown County Pick a Lollipop, help a dog A season to remember G-Men hit the field for first baseball scrimmage Eastern’s Rigdon, Purdy earn AP SE District Div. III honors New blocking, kicking rules address risk minimization in high school football Judy A Schneider James M Darnell Lawanda R Truesdell Paul E Grisham Arrelous R Rowland Dennis E Stivers David M Daniels Fayetteville man is charged with child porn April 1st Grand Opening for Jacob’s Ladder Resale Boutique in Georgetown Talent Show auditions at Gaslight Theatre Nine indicted by county grand jury Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall visit coming next May to BC Fairgrounds In it to win it! Bronco wrestlers end season on successful note Eastern’s Hopkins finishes 5th in long jump at OATCCC State Indoor Track and Field Meet SBAAC awards academic all-stars, winning teams Marvin D Atkin Beverly S Flatt Jessie M Sanders Leroy Deck Sr Jody A Towler Sherman E Young Kenneth C Burton Varnau’s face second defamation suit Attorney General to visit Georgetown schools Clermont County GOP hosts Wenstrup, DeWine at dinner Fatal car crash in Adams County BC Chamber welcomes new Cricket Wireless store to Mt. Orab Aberdeen Council approves 2017 budget Royce K Zimmerman Lady Warriors advance to Elite 8 SBAAC awards boys basketball all-stars SBAAC girls basketball all-stars take home awards SHAC Winter Sports Awards Banquet set for March 12 Altman claims 170-pound district title Sirkka L Buller Arthur C Schneider Lowell G Neal Virginia M Schirmer Connie S Darling Harold L Purdin Terry E Frye Lucille Schumacher Lady Warriors roll to district finals Broncos take care of business to claim sectional crown G-Men upset MVCA to earn berth sectional finals WBHS JROTC Rifle Team competes at Camp Perry Lady Rockets finish 12-12 Season reaches end for Rockets Eugene D Ring Two indicted on major drug charges Two charged with home invasion Cincinnati airport expanding services, lowering prices in effort to compete Two sentenced in common pleas court Georgetown man hurt in car crash Robert G Miller Linda M Howland Robert E McKinney Mildred J Hodges Farrel L Amiott Patricia Brown Rick L Dye Mary E Nagel Betty Ratliff Broncos claim SBAAC wrestling title Broncos pull ahead for win over G-Men in SBAAC Tourney Ripley boys wrap up regular season with win at Lynchburg Eastern girls are sectional champs Anderson pleads not guilty to battery charge Some county offices to change locations Fayetteville prepares for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall HealthSource hosts Chamber of Commerce meeting Five sentenced in Brown County Common Pleas Court June Howser Marguerite A Fender Timothy D Harris Jay R Purdy Robin S Godwin Marc A Wachter Chester W Eyre Warriors blast past the G-Men, 61-40 Rockets performing well heading into post-season tournament play Lady Warriors bring home the Gold with perfect 13-0 finish in SHAC Western Brown Junior High wrestling team wraps up successful season Rockets fall victim to ‘Pack’ attack Broncos suffer heartbreaking loss to Mentor Lake Catholic in state quarterfinals Adult Education Center coming to county ‘Senior Playground’ moving forward at Georgetown park Brown County 4-H kicks off another year Eastern Middle School celebrates “Kindness Week” Billie L Shoemaker

Marijuana amendment defeated

By Daniel Karell

dkarell@civitasmedia.com

The citizens of Ohio sent a resounding no to marijuana legalization on election night.

As of press time, with nearly 70 percent of precincts reporting in the state, issue three, which would have legalized marijuana and effectively created a monopoly on growing and selling sites, lost by a nearly 30 percent margin, 65 to 35, according to the Ohio Secretary of State’s website. The website states that issue three received 819,949 yes votes and 1,515,981 no votes.

Interestingly, the precincts reporting across the state show that issue two, which protects the initiative process from creating a monopoly, passed, but only by around a 52 to 48 margin.

In Brown County, issue three was defeated by a nearly 59 to 41 margin, with 7,051 voting no and 4,944 voting yes.

In response to successful ballot box amendments to decriminalize marijuana in four U.S. states – Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and Colorado – the Political Action Committee Responsible Ohio petitioned to place Issue three on this November’s ballot.

The legalization amendment overcame numerous hurdles, including initial rejections on petition language from Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and an investigation into legal signatures collected on the petition by Ohio Secretary of State John Husted. But eventually, it was approved to be on the ballot.

If it’s passed, issue three would allow the limited sale and possession of marijuana to those 21-years or older, both recreationally and medicinally. But different from the other states where amendments passed, issue three calls for the creation of ten growing sites in ten Ohio counties, where all of the state’s marijuana crop will be sold and distributed from.

The ten pre-determined sites are co-owned by some famous individuals, including former 98 Degrees front-man Nick Lachey and former University of Cincinnati and NBA star Oscar Robertson. The ten sites are located in Clermont, Hamilton, Butler, Licking, Lorain, Lucas, Delaware, Summit, Franklin, and Stark Counties.

The facilities are called marijuana growth, cultivation and extraction facilities (MGCEs), and they have exclusive rights to commercial production of marijuana, and it’s for this reason that there has been plenty of opposition to the amendment. While many opponents don’t want to see marijuana legalized at all, even more are against what they’re calling a “marijuana monopoly.”

By having only ten sites to grow and distribute marijuana for sale statewide, and writing into law that marijuana retailers can only sell marijuana from those sites, opponents believe that they would be codifying a monopoly, or oligopoly.

The opponents therefore quickly put on the ballot a counter-measure, issue two, which would prohibit monopolies being formed through ballot measures. To use the wording on the referendum, it states that’s an anti-monopoly amendment that “protects the initiative process from being used for personal economic benefit.”

The first line of the measure states, “prohibit any petitioner from using the Ohio Constitution to grant a monopoly, oligopoly, or cartel for their exclusive financial benefit or to establish a preferential tax status,” which is clearly a jab at issue three.

Opponents of issue three include the likes of Governor John Kasich, DeWine, Auditor of State Ned Yost, the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, and the Ohio Manufactures Association.

Locally, Brown County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Carl Smith has come out in opposition to issue three.

Supporters include former Ohio Senate Minority Leader Eric Kearney, and former Cincinnati Police Chief Tom Streicher.

Opponents of issue three have asked for voters to vote yes on issue two and no on issue three, with issue three supporters asking voters to do the opposite.

Reading the fine print, if issue three is passed, anyone 21 years of age or older can “grow, cultivate, use, possess, and share up to eight ounces of usable homegrown marijuana plus four flowering marijuana plants” if they acquire a valid state marijuana license, similar to a person acquiring a hunting license.

In addition, anyone 21 years of age or older may “purchase, possess, transport, use, or share” up to one ounce of marijuana. It’s not included in the ballot measure, but those caught with more than one ounce of marijuana without a license are still subject to local and state laws.

Medical marijuana would also be authorized by the passage of this measure.

In terms of purchasing retail marijuana, the revenue earned would be taxed at a flat rate of 15 percent, with a special five percent tax placed on each retail store’s revenue.

The measure would also apply limits on governmental regulation of the measure.

Two bullets state that if passed, the measure would “prohibit any local or state law, including zoning laws, from being applied to prohibit the development or operation of marijuana growth, cultivation, and extraction facilities, retail marijuana stores, and medical marijuana dispensaries” unless those areas are zoned residential as of Jan. 1, 2015, and “limit the ability of the legislature and local governments from regulating the manufacture, sales, distribution, and use of marijuana and marijuana products.”

If passed, issue three would go into effect on December 3, 30 days after the election. If issue two passes, it would go into effect immediately.

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By Daniel Karell

dkarell@civitasmedia.com

Reach Daniel Karell at 937-378-6161. Follow him on Twitter @GNDKarell

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2016 News Democrat