John D Marks Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia Broncos buck Clinton-Massie, Goshen James H Boyd Warren A Stanley Jane R Ernst

Issues and Levies on the ballot

Coming up to election day, there are no less than 18 local issues and levies up for a vote, from townships to villages to school districts.

Here’s a closer look at this November’s issues and levies, with comments from public officials:

Jefferson Twp. – Unincorporated Area – Renewal – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 2 Mills – 5 years

Jefferson Twp. – Incorporated & Unincorporated Areas – Additional – Maintaining & Operating Cemeteries – 1 Mill – 5 years

Gary Pickerill, Jefferson Township Trustee:

“The fire levy is a renewal and it’s put on the ballot to cover the expenses for the contract with Russellville, which was put on ten years ago. We haven’t changed the millage on it. It’s just to cover our contract for protection. We feel like we need it to cover that expense because our general fund is pretty low.

It will generate somewhere in the neighborhood of 22,000. That does cover our contract for Fire and EMS. Our contract is 20,000 to the village and then as needed they will come to us and ask for a little bit for something extra, or set aside to help if they need a lump sum of 3,000-4,000 we can vote on that and extend some of that money.

The cemetery levy, it’s been a .7 mill, and I know in the 1970s it was .7 but in 2015 it was .7. We are asking the voters for an additional .3 mills to cover perpetual care, mowing, grave digging, things like that. Also looking to the future, our space is getting limited and we’re going to have to purchase ground to expand sooner or later. We’re asking for a little extra to set aside money for that.

“We’re hoping the voters will support us and will continue supporting us.”

Lewis Twp. – Unincorporated Area – Renewal – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 1 Mill – 5 years

Robert Starrett, Lewis Township Trustee:

“For the continued service that we’ve been providing they need to vote yes, because we do have fire and EMS service for both ends and we share Lewis with Hamersville. With the cost of equipment and supplies today, it’s starting to get unreal. It’s what we need to do to maintain the level of service that we do have. Without it, it hurts. You couldn’t provide some of the services you have right now. It’s very important that we pass this levy.”

Perry Twp. – Incorporated & Unincorporated Areas – Renewal – Ambulance/EMS – 2 Mills – 3 years

Perry Twp. – Incorporated & Unincorporated Areas – Renewal – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 1 Mill – 3

years.

Judy Iles, Perry Township Fiscal Officer

“The one mill levy is for the fire department, and the two mill levy is for the EMS. The EMS levy should generate around $144,000 per year.

“It’s very vital. Everybody depends on the EMS now, it’s been in place for quite a few years and it’s very beneficial. They do ambulance runs and it doesn’t cost a person to take the ambulance, and of course the fire levy they depend on that as they’re the largest township in the county. Most of them are volunteer firemen and EMS workers.”

Georgetown Exempted Village School District – Renewal – General Perm. Improvements – 1.5 Mills – 5 years

Georgetown Superintendent Chris Burrows

“It’s a permanent improvement levy. It just means that we can spend our money on things that are going to permanently improve our facilities. The way that I really like to explain it is what you or I would do in our own homes for improvement. Anything that we can do there, that’s what permanent improvement money is for.

“We’ve tried to spend that permanent improvement money (in the past) on things that will reduce our general fund expenditures,” Burrows said. “For example, LED (light emitting diodes) lighting is an expenditure our of permanent improvement funds, but then our general fund expenditures go down because of energy savings. It’s like what you’d do in your own home, just a good business move.

“We’ve invested heavily in technology. Every student in our district, from fifth grade to 12th grade, has an iPad, and we’re going to continue to do that as we roll things out. Curriculum is important as well. Textbooks are something that we’ve put on the back burner for 15 years waiting on technology to take over, so permanent improvement money can be spent on curriculum resources.

“So as we go forward, that’s where some of our money’s going to be spent. We’re still going to look at energy efficient ways that we can spend our of permanent improvement to reduce general fund expenditures. And then the technology infrastructure, I think sometimes people see the user and the device someone has in their hand, but the infrastructure behind the scenes is very expensive. From servers, to the wifi system, to the routers, it’s extremely expensive. That infrastructure is fairly new and what I say is on the bleeding edge.”

Fayetteville Village – Current Operating Expenses – Renewal – 2.1 Mills – 5 years

Fayetteville Village – Current Operating Expenses – Renewal – 3 Mills – 5 years

Bob Campbell, Fayetteville interim Mayor

“The levies are for the operating expenses for the village. It goes into the general fund. Then it’s divided out to street department and stuff like that.

“Because we’re running on a tight budget, we don’t have lot of money and it’s necessary to keep the village operating. It would put extreme hardship if it didn’t pass. We’re low on funds as it is. It would put a lot more strain on our budget.”

Georgetown Village – Renewal – Fire Protection – 2.4 Mills – 5 years

Georgetown Fire and EMS Chief Joe Rockey:

“It’s essentially, besides the three townships Pleasant, Scott, and Franklin, the money that we generate in this levy is what we operate on. Without that, we have no money. We have a small reserve, but it wouldn’t last long. Out of our entire budget, the townships make up a very small percentage of the money we operate on.

“The money goes towards maintaining the equipment we have, and every year we do preventative maintenance and there’s testing involved. Every air pack has to be tested, every mask has to be tested, the ladders have to be tested, trucks have to be tested, pumps have to be tested on every piece of apparatus, so it gets very expensive. Plus, buying any new equipment, replacing outdated or no longer operable equipment, and replacing the trucks as needed.

“Without the levy, we’d come on hard times. To keep the fire department where it’s at, and to keep progressing, the levy needs to pass.

Village of Mt. Orab – Additional – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 2 Mills – Continuing Period of Time

Mt. Orab Mayor Bruce Lunsford:

“We’re having staffing issues, we need to replace life squads, and we need additional people. We were kind of being overwhelmed with life squad runs, especially with the aging population. A lot more people in the area are over the age of 50, and it just creates a lot more life squad runs.

“Until you decide to do something different, you don’t have to worry about getting it re-done. it can be taken off or voted off at any time, it’s not a permanent thing that can never be changed.

“It will raise about $100,000 per year.”

Village of Russellville – Renewal – Current Expenses – 3.3 Mills – 5 years

Village of Russellville – Renewal – Current Expenses – 4.5 Mills – 5 years

“These levies are used for vari
ous things. They could be used for police protection, the fire department, and/or EMS. If it’s used for general fund, it can be used for anything, like a street repair that needs to be done or to fix a broken traffic light.

“When you look at police levy or fire levy, we cannot pay salaries out of those. Police, Fire and EMS salaries are coming out of the general fund. It’s important for these levies to get passed for the village, because we can do various things for many people of this village. The levies are expected to bring in $15,000-20,000 per year.”

Huntington Twp. Incorporated & Unincorporated Areas –Renewal – Fire Protection – 1.2 Mills – 5 years

Higginsport Village – Additional – Current Expenses – 5 Mills – 5 years

Hamersville Village – Renewal – Police Protection 2 Mills – 5 years

Pike Twp. – Unincorporated Area – Additional – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 1 Mill – 5 years.

Pleasant Twp. – Unincorporated Area – Replacement & Increase – Fire – 1.5 Mills with an increase of 0.5 Mills = 2 Mills – Continuing Period of Time

Sterling Twp. – Unincorporated Area – Replacement – Fire/Ambulance/EMS – 3 Mills – Continuing Period of Time

By Daniel Karell

dkarell@civitasmedia.com

Reach Daniel Karell at 937-378-6161. Follow him on Twitter @GNDKarell

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2016 News Democrat