Anderson pleads not guilty to battery charge Some county offices to change locations Fayetteville prepares for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall HealthSource hosts Chamber of Commerce meeting Five sentenced in Brown County Common Pleas Court June Howser Marguerite A Fender Timothy D Harris Jay R Purdy Robin S Godwin Marc A Wachter Chester W Eyre Warriors blast past the G-Men, 61-40 Rockets performing well heading into post-season tournament play Lady Warriors bring home the Gold with perfect 13-0 finish in SHAC Western Brown Junior High wrestling team wraps up successful season Rockets fall victim to ‘Pack’ attack Broncos suffer heartbreaking loss to Mentor Lake Catholic in state quarterfinals Adult Education Center coming to county ‘Senior Playground’ moving forward at Georgetown park Brown County 4-H kicks off another year Eastern Middle School celebrates “Kindness Week” Billie L Shoemaker Erma J Teeters Ralph L Tracy Darrell Inskeep Jeffrey C Clark Carole Metzger Tommy R Ring Brent A Arn Daniel L Sellers Lady Warriors finish regular season as SHAC Division I champions Regular season comes to a close for Lady Rockets Howell commits to Walsh Rockets peaking at right time Emotions run high as Eastern seniors present disabled students with signed basketballs on Senior Night Broncos top Bethel-Tate at In-School Dual before heading to state tourney Lady G-Men shoot down the Rockets State Senator Uecker tours Georgetown schools Proposed school budget numbers released by Kasich Todd Rumpke remembered, honored with Lifetime Achievement Award Ten year old from Hamersville appears in commercials Three sentenced in common pleas Emery D Sutherland Robert C Downs Sr Chester A Lanter Robert L Orr Jessica L Farris Broncos are Region 15 champs Jays soar to win over Eastern Lady Warriors roll to 18-1 Pitch count regulation approved for high school baseball Lady G-Men top Amelia for sixth win Regular season winding down for Lady Broncos Awards presented at Chamber Breakfast ‘Number one heroin dealer’ gets 15 years Seven indicted by county grand jury Aberdeen searches for new fiscal officer Aberdeen searches for new fiscal officer Harold Wardlow Kimberly B Petri Betty L Gifford Ollie J Slone Ralph J Snider James R Garman Betty L Greiner RULH welcomes four new members to Sports Hall of Fame Broncos gallop to win over Hillsboro Rockets soar past Whiteoak Broncos advance to Div. II, Region 15 Semifinals Jays edge out Peebles James S Kesler Veterans honored with service medals Man arrested after home invasion Truck driver faces manslaughter charges after November crash BC Chamber prepares for 2017 Business Breakfast, Monday, Jan. 30 in Georgetown BC Animal Shelter asks people to consider adopting a dog Victor J Bohl Vivian Coleen Charles E Bates Sr Eal Lainhart Michael D Karos Jr John H Kirk Janet R Meyer Patsy A Clark Dorothy J Schroeder Broncos trample the G-Men, 73-40 Rockets down the Devils, 59-55 Seven new inductees to enter WBHS Sports Hall of Fame Lady Warriors ascend to 13-1 Broncos finish 2nd of 22 teams in Hammer and Anvil Invitational Hedwig Lambert Billie G Walkup Some county offices may be moved G’town Council approves 2017 budget Family doubles in size with adoption Sardinia Mayor looks forward to 2017 2017 Fayetteville Firemen’s Festival set Floyd Newberry Jr Donna F Lang

The real legacy of Johnny Appleseed

John Chapman could be described as a successful real estate speculator with a good understanding of how to increase your wealth through compound interest. He is also one of the most misrepresented and misunderstood figures in American history. His biggest contribution to life on the American frontier was to create a renewable supply of hard cider and “applejack”, the favorite liquors of the expanding American population of his time. He was a religious zealot, a wild-eyed Swedenborgian missionary with the flinty toughness of Daniel Boone and the gentleness of a Hindu. Oh, and by the way, he planted millions of apple trees from seed.

Later reinvented as the cartoonish “Johnny Appleseed”, John Chapman was a pioneer who made a huge impact on America’s frontier, particularly in Ohio. He started a chain of nurseries reaching from western Pennsylvania through central Ohio and into Indiana. With the canny shrewdness of a real estate developer, staying just ahead of the westward migration, Chapman planted nurseries near remote settlements. When he died in 1845, his estate included 22 properties totaling over 1200 acres of prime waterfront real estate.

To discourage speculation and encourage stability, land grant deeds in the Northwest Territory required homesteaders to plant apple and pear orchards. Grafted apple trees with edible fruit were already available in Ohio, but Chapman grew his from seed. Apples don’t sprout “true to type” from seed, so fruit from Chapman’s trees was mostly bitter, useful only for making hard cider, which could be distilled into applejack. Safer, tastier and much easier to make than wine or grain liquors, apple cider was the alcoholic drink of choice on the American frontier. In fact, there was little else to drink. In rural areas, cider replaced wine, beer, coffee, tea and even water.

Young apple trees were essential supplies for any settler headed for the frontier, and John Chapman offered two and three year old saplings for about six cents each. He had a sixth sense for where the next wave of development would be, and by the time the demand was there he had a well-located nursery in full production, run by a local manager. In addition to apples, Chapman introduced many medicinal herbs to Ohio, and also stinking fennel. This annoying weed was once believed to prevent malaria; today it’s commonly called “Johnnyweed” by Ohioans.

Johnny Appleseed’s legacy became a target during Prohibition, when Carrie Nation’s axe was used to chop down apple trees along with saloons. Because of their popularity and for religious reasons, hard cider and applejack enjoyed some immunity from the early prohibitionists, but by 1900 they were attacked along with wine, beer and grain spirits. Johnny’s legend was reinvented, his image sanitized for political correctness.

In his excellent book “The Botany of Desire,” author Michael Pollan explores the Johnny Appleseed legend in detail. He concludes that John Chapman was “the American Dionysus”. Where Dionysus brought civilization the gift of wine, Chapman offered easier access to the pleasures of alcohol. Pollan views both men as bridges between nature and culture, harnessing the magic of fermentation to create social change.

The take-home message for gardeners is that apple trees grown from seed will not produce the same fruit as the original apple. Only grafting will produce dependable offspring with the qualities of the parent apple tree.

Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Nursery and Landscape, located 9736 Tri-County Highway, near Winchester. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call 937-587-7021.

http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Boehme-sig.pdf

Growing apple trees from seed worked for Johnny Appleseed, but it won’t produce edible fruit for home orchardists. (Illustration by Marjorie Boehme)
http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Johnny-Appleseed.jpgGrowing apple trees from seed worked for Johnny Appleseed, but it won’t produce edible fruit for home orchardists. (Illustration by Marjorie Boehme)

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