Moore sentenced to 16 years in prison for assault Tea Party holds candidate forum Hamersville Police Dept. introduces newest officer Russellville Council takes action on closing alleys Anthony R Traylor Caryl J Eyre Jays clinch 2nd in SHAC Division I Week 7 football roundup Battle between Eastern, Ripley ends in tie Broncos are SBAAC American Divison champs Lady Rockets enter final game of regular season on 3-game win streak Lady G-Men claim wins over Manchester, Bethel-Tate Lady Broncos win at New Richmond, rise to first in SBAAC American Division standings Judge approves sale of hospital Trump losing support in Ohio delegation Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Joyce A Mignerey George W Kilgore Vernon Creighton Brittany A Perkins Sister Jane Stier Jeff Bess Russell Rockwell Lady Warriors looking to get back to winning ways G-Men rise to 2nd in SBAAC Nat’l Division Western Brown volleyball team jumps to 12-6 with wins over Norwood, CNE Week six football roundup Track champions determined at MRP in an exciting night of racing action Sectional tourney play begins for Western Brown girls tennis Phillips, Sininger advance to district golf tourney Christopher W Baker Sherry A Napier Betty L Kelley Virginia E Deininger Shirley J Carr 2016 Brown County Fair comes to an end Coroner appeals ruling on Goldson investigation Ripley Federal merges with Southern Hills RUCK March set to raise veteran suicide awareness Louise I McCann Louise I McCann Jackie Garrison Kathy S Jordan Rockets rally for first league win Lady Broncos rise to 10-6 with win at Wilmington Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. title Lady G-Men looking to bounce back from recent losses SHAC golf season in the books Lady Rockets top Whiteoak Fair Royalty chosen for 2016 Troop Box Ministry still going strong after 15 years Three sentenced in Common Pleas Alex K Miller Denvil Burchell Maneva H Teague Vincent A Cluxton Stanley J Brannock Robert L Dyer Mary L Phillips Broncos gallop to 9-0-1 with win over G-Men Tight battle continues for SBAAC American Division volleyball title Jays rally for win over Rockets Week 4 football roundup Sininger is SBAAC Nat’l Division Golfer of Year Lady Rockets top CCD, fall to CNE Janet R Reveal Paul D Hines Gas skimmers stealing identities Democrats meet in G’town Humane Society horses now up for adoption New ‘B-Fit Program’ at this year’s fair Drug Task Force marijuana eradication Cheryl L Sams Aaron S Cartwright Tommie E Stout Rockets soar past the Warriors, 5-0 G-Men place runner-up in Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady Warriors cruise to victory over Fayetteville Broncos remain unbeaten at 6-0-1 Lady G-Men win at Ripley Week 3 football roundup Broncos lead after round two of SBAAC American Division play Ohana Music Festival a huge success Man charged with 292 counts of child porn possession G’Town Council resolves zoning issues, to hold public meeting on medical marijuana Chase pleads guilty to obscenity charges Georgetown Nativity Scene to be on display, much longer this year Georgetown Police Chief Rob Freeland, updates council on village happenings Jay R Crawford Kenneth James Verne Wisby, Sr Kenneth J Barber Olivette F Corbett David E Kelsey, Sr Betty A Stegbauer Virginia McConnaughey Chantal C Cook Chase pleads guilty to obscenity charges Brown County jobless rate at 16 year low UC to eliminate smoking on campus

Soybean issues continue

The growing season of 2015 will be one that we talk about for some time to come. The good planting weather for most of the grain crops was followed by six or seven weeks of excessive rain that delayed hay harvest, some tobacco being set, and most of the wheat from being harvested, so that meant very few double crop soybeans, too.

The soybeans that were planted suffered from the excessive amount of water just like much of the tobacco crop and hay and wheat that could not be harvested in a timely manner. Corn for the most part seems to be ok or in most cases better than just ok. The later corn that is grown for silage seems to have been impacted more than the early corn.

Diseases have shown up in many of the crops as a result of the excessive moisture. Some of the diseases are typical diseases that we see from time to time in crops. However, last week I received a call about something that was taking a toll on many acres of the soybeans in the Sardinia/Mowrystown area. Our OSU Extension State Soybean Specialist and I visited some of the fields where the problem was showing up, last week. Unfortunately there was no clear cut answer for what was happening. There could be a combination of things, but what is most likely a big factor is just too much water. The issue flared up after a 2.5 inch rainfall that occurred during the evening of Aug. 19.

If you have not scouted your soybeans recently, it may be worth the trip. Then again, with no answer for the cause other than excessive moisture, maybe you just don’t want to see it. The damage in severe in some of the fields I saw late last week. Yield loss will be significant. The beans are podded and have beans in them. However, the entire field was not showing the symptoms, so parts of the fields appear to be dead and losing or already lost their leaves while parts of the fields are still very green. The areas where beans were dead were already subject to pods shattering.

Antibiotic Resistance: Let’s Change the Way We Understand It

I found this in a recent Beef Blog. This is one of those topics that we really need to know more about, and as it is in most cases, we only hear one side of the story. This link will take you to the full article if you wish to read more,

In the past few days, there have been two interesting reports on antibiotic resistance. One was released by Consumer Reports entitled, “How Safe Is Your Ground Beef?” The other, much less publicized, was put together by scientists and physicians who work in public health and do know something about antibiotic resistance.

This second report was published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report and is part of the Grand Rounds by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From this second report, I like both the title, “Getting Smart about Antibiotics,” and the fact that the authors present an appalling number of figures pointing out the impact of inappropriate antibiotic use in human medicine.

There is no doubt that the “increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is one of the most serious threats to public health in the 21st century.” But there is also no doubt that this is a complex issue, and pitting one food system against others will not solve the problem. Blaming the use of antibiotics in medicine versus veterinary medicine will not solve the problem either. But for some reason, the discourse about antibiotics resistance has taken the form of blaming somebody or something.

The study of antibiotic resistance is extremely complex because of the variability in the methods of testing for antibiotic resistance and the temporal and spatial inconsistencies in the results. An example of this variability can be seen on the website of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Systems.

Farm Science Review Tickets

Remember that we have Farm Science Review tickets available at all OSU Extension Offices until Sept. 21 or we run out of tickets. For more information about the Farm Science Review go the website at

Dates to Remember

Sept. 3- Adams County Junior Fair Beef BBQ

Sept. 5-12- Highland County Fair

Sept. 14- Pesticide Testing at Old Y Restaurant at Noon. Pre-register at or call 1-800-282-1955

Sept. 22-24- Farm Science Review

Sept. 28- Oct. 3- Brown County Fair

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