Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Fourteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Commissioners donate to task force Voters return Worley to the bench Georgetown Police Department welcomes new officers Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber Meth makes a comeback The bomber crash of 1944 4-H holds ‘shootout’ with BCSO County jobless rate falls Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves G’town FFA has great fair Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Eight indicted by grand jury Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Body found in ditch, investigation underway Former Aberdeen Fiscal Officer pleads guilty Keeping kids safe on the school bus Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Sheriff Ellis meets President Trump Quarter Auction to pay for fire engine restoration Upcoming Quarter Raffle, Oct. 14 to benefit PRC Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Fayetteville cancels school after threat Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Jennings faces multiple sex offenses Georgetown nears water system completion Bible Baptist Barbeque brings big crowd Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia

Disabilities

Blind from birth, Chris Danielson is director of public relations for the 50,000-member National Federation of the Blind, based in Baltimore, the nation’s oldest and largest organization led by blind people.

In a telephone interview, 44-year-old Danielson said, “I grew up an Army brat. We never lived abroad because my parents wanted to make sure I had the best educational opportunities. My dad asked the Army for compassionate treatment because he had what the military called a child with special needs. So he was never posted on foreign soil.”

As for his blindness, Danielson said, “Doctors aren’t exactly sure what I had at birth. Basically, my eyes did not fully develop in utero. I see only a little artificial light now. I can walk into my office and forget to turn the lights on and not realize it for several hours. I believe I can detect sunlight but am not sure.”

The Danielsons settled in South Carolina, where Chris’ parents were determined to give him a “normal” life. Teachers at his first school said Chris would do better at a residential school for the blind, but his parents strongly disagreed. Instead, his parents worked hard to integrate their son into public school. They even queried school districts to learn which ones had experience and success with blind students. He began learning Braille in kindergarten.

He said, “And my parents never kept me from doing things. If my friends were going roller skating, for example, then I was also going roller skating.”

The summer after seventh grade, and during an emotional rough patch due to being the only blind student at school, he attended a camp with other blind children. For the first time, he felt socially connected with others having the same issues and experiences.

His parents’ emphasis on Chris getting a good education and having a “normal” life seemed to pay off. Danielson graduated with a political science degree from Furman University. While there, he had won a national scholarship from the National Federation of the Blind. In law school, he was a law clerk at a large firm, and also for the South Carolina Senate Judiciary Committee. After law school, he started his own private practice, where he did family law, personal injury, and some low-level criminal defense.

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Blind attorney becomes national advocate

By Daniel Vance

Contributing Columnist

Daniel Vance is originally from this area. He now writes Disabilities by Daniel J. Vance, which is sponsored by Blue Valley Sod and Palmer Bus Service.

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2016 News Democrat