James E Newman Paul E Funk Alan Hanselman Robert V Nash III Frances L Poole Minnie E Fisher Donovan M Pope Irvin E Stiens Myrtle L Lane Ralph L Davidson August J Pace Carl R Brown Phyllis J Beard Lady G-Men complete sweep of Tigers in SBAAC Nat’l Division G-Men pluck Cardinals, 6-4 Warriors climb to 4-1 in SHAC with victory over North Adams Broncos rally in 7th for 5-4 win over Batavia Blue Jays still in search of first win Three million dollar jail expansion planned Higginsport enforcing speed with camera Unemployment rate falls in county, southern Ohio Varnau not restricted from talking online about Goldson case Rockets fall to 4-1 in SHAC with loss to North Adams Bronco tennis team tops Bethel-Tate, 5-0 Lady G-Men rise to 7-4 with win at Goshen Lady Broncos’ big bats hammer out 11-0 win over Batavia G-Men showing improvement Keith Shouse Diane L Steele August Hensley Louise R Murrell Fire strikes Mt. Orab Bible Baptist Church Grant Days 2017 attractions Man accused of sex crime, giving pot to kids Ten indicted by Brown County Grand Jury 5th Annual Rick Eagan Memorial 5K Run/Walk coming up in May Birds of Prey Three sentenced in common pleas court John H Young II Sally A Gibson Barbara Burris Mary Ann Napier Martha L Newland Marlene Thompson Patricia A Firrell Kellie J Berry Mt. Orab, Hamersville students take part in ‘Hoops for Heart’ Eastern players take part in District 14 All-Star Games DeWine meets with local officials Eastern Superintendent praises students accomplishments during board meeting Local author’s story appears in new book Four sentenced in common pleas court Three to run for Municipal Judge Grant Days 2017 coming in April Lincoln’s Generals at Grant Days Brenda R Harris Mock crash staged at Georgetown High School Georgetown to hire eighth full time police officer Reception honoring Becky Cropper April 2 PRC to host annual community supper Rockets blast past the Blue Jays Georgetown hosts ‘season opener’ track and field invite Lady Rockets cruise to 10-0 win over Ripley Lady Warriors, Lady G-Men split games in season opener double-header Bobby A Reed Harold L Barger Ralph M Gaither Stranded students rescued by Brown County cooperation 4-H Teen Ambassador Dunning attends SHOT Show Veterans Service Commission invites veterans to seek help with benefits Unemployment rate rises in Brown County Pick a Lollipop, help a dog A season to remember G-Men hit the field for first baseball scrimmage Eastern’s Rigdon, Purdy earn AP SE District Div. III honors New blocking, kicking rules address risk minimization in high school football Judy A Schneider James M Darnell Lawanda R Truesdell Paul E Grisham Arrelous R Rowland Dennis E Stivers David M Daniels Fayetteville man is charged with child porn April 1st Grand Opening for Jacob’s Ladder Resale Boutique in Georgetown Talent Show auditions at Gaslight Theatre Nine indicted by county grand jury Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall visit coming next May to BC Fairgrounds In it to win it! Bronco wrestlers end season on successful note Eastern’s Hopkins finishes 5th in long jump at OATCCC State Indoor Track and Field Meet SBAAC awards academic all-stars, winning teams Marvin D Atkin Beverly S Flatt Jessie M Sanders Leroy Deck Sr Jody A Towler Sherman E Young Kenneth C Burton Varnau’s face second defamation suit

Inflation and your Retirement Income Strategy

You might not think much about inflation. After all, it’s been quite low for the past several years. Still, you may want to take it into account when you’re planning your retirement income strategy.

Of course, no one can really predict the future course of inflation. But it’s a pretty safe bet it won’t disappear altogether — and even a mild inflation rate, over time, can strongly erode your purchasing power.

Consider this: If you were to purchase an item today for $100, that same item, in 25 years, would cost you $209, assuming an annual inflation rate of 3%. That’s a pretty big difference.

During your working years, you can hope that your income will at least rise enough to match inflation.

But what about when you retire? How can you minimize the impact of inflation on your retirement income?

One thing you can certainly do is include an inflation assumption in your calculations of how much annual income you’ll need.

The number you choose as an inflation factor could possibly be based on recent inflation levels, but you might want to err on the conservative side and use a slightly higher figure. Since you may be retired for two or three decades, you might have to periodically adjust the inflation factor to correspond to the actual inflation rate.

Another important step is maintaining an investment portfolio that can potentially provide returns well above the inflation rate. Historically, stocks have been the only investment category — as opposed to investments such as Treasury bills and long-term government bonds — whose returns have significantly outpaced inflation.

So you may want to consider owning an appropriate percentage of stocks and stock-based investments in your portfolio, even during your retirement years.

Now, you might be concerned at the mention of the words “stocks” and “retirement years” in the same sentence.

After all, stocks will fluctuate in value, sometimes dramatically, and even though you may be retired for a long time, you won’t want to wait for years to “bounce back” from a bad year in the market. But not all investments move in the same direction at the same time; spreading your dollars among a range of asset classes — large stocks, small and mid-cap stocks, bonds, , certificates of deposit (CDs), foreign investments and so on — may help you reduce the impact of volatility on your portfolio.

And you don’t even have to rely solely on stocks to help combat inflation. You could also consider Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities, or TIPS. When you purchase a TIPS, your principal increases with inflation and decreases with deflation, as measured by the Consumer Price Index.

Your TIPS pay interest twice a year, at a fixed rate; this rate is applied to the adjusted principal, so your interest payments will rise with inflation and fall with deflation.

When your TIPS matures, you will receive adjusted principal or original principal, whichever is greater.

As is the case with other bonds, though, you could choose to sell your TIPS before it matures.*

Work with your financial advisor to help decide what moves are right for you to help protect your retirement income from inflation. It may be a “hidden” threat, but you don’t want to ignore it.

* Yield to maturity cannot be predetermined, due to uncertain future inflation adjustments.

If TIPS are sold prior to maturity, you may receive less than your initial investment amount. I

f bonds are not held in a tax-advantaged account, investors will be required to pay federal taxes on the accredited value annually, although they will not receive any principal payment until maturity.

When the inflation rate is high and the principal value is rising significantly, the taxes paid on TIPS may exceed interest income received.

Therefore, TIPS may not be suitable for investors who depend on their investments for living expenses.

Jim Holden is a local Edward Jones Financial Advisor in Georgetown. Edward Jones, it employees and financial advisors are not estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice.

http://newsdemocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Jim-Holden.pdf

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