Virginia L McQuitty Practices get underway for fall sports Jays soon to begin quest for SHAC title Western Brown to hold Meet the Teams Night and OHSAA parent meeting Aug. 8 Norville F Hardyman Carol J Tracy James Witt Hundreds of Narcan doses used in 2016 Heavy weekend rain causes flooding and damaged roads Child Focus hosts Chamber of Commerce meeting Mary F McElroy Broncos out to defend SBAAC American Division soccer title Bronco 5K to take place Aug. 5 EHS volleyball team ready for new season Michael C Cooper Raymond Mays Harry E Smittle Jr Mary A Flaugher Western Brown’s Leto excels in Australia Rockets ready for 1st season in SBAAC Paddling, hiking activities available at Ohio State Parks SB Warriors get set to hit gridiron for 2nd year of varsity football Scotty W Johnson Glenna V Moertle Ricky L Hoffer Ruth E Ward David A Watson Janet L Dotson Vilvie S King Steven C Utter Cropper joins Fallis at Bethel-Tate Local kids find success in world of martial arts 13th annual Bronco 5K Run and Fitness Walk set for Aug. 5 Teams compete in memory of Randy Fulton Mike W Smith Roger Helton David A Borders Timothy E Argenbright Joseph W Sherrill Frances K Pedigo Cecil N Graham Sawyers charged in sex for heroin plot Group demands changes at ELSD Blanche Malblanc Pauline L Kirk Over 70 take part in 11th Joe Myers 5K Classic Lions Club 4th of July Festival brings outdoor fun to Ripley ODNR reminds visitors to swim safe this summer Changes in high school track and field/cross country rules include school issued and approved uniforms Betty L Philpott Judy B Williams Billie J Russell Remembering Ravye 25 attend volleyball camp in Fayetteville Western Brown hosts Pee Wee Football Camp Eugene L Baumann Kids enjoy a ‘Touch-a-Truck’ event in Mt. Orab New police chief takes over in Fayetteville BC Chamber moving forward on 2017 SummerFest Two killed in wrong way crash in Mt. Orab Jack Hamilton Charles L Glover Maxine M Stires Western Brown youth basketball camps a success Leto to represent Team USA in Australia Broncos hard at work in preparation for fall season Eastern approves bowling team Phyllis Ruth Lois A Manley Eddie L Carr Thomas L Carnahan Cameron Barkley Walter J McGee Gary J Graham George D Johnson Walter F Crawford Jr Charles E Meranda Jr Corbin testifies before Ohio Senate Five arrested in Hamersville drug bust Neil Diamond tribute band coming Hyde finds home at Midway Youngsters work to improve on hoop skills at Eastern basketball camps Sizer named All-District Honorable Mention Western Brown’s Barnes earns All-State, All-District honors Local players compete in SWOFCA Ron Woyan East/West All-Star Game 6th annual Ravye Williams Memorial 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament set for June 24 Clarence E Teal Rosie B Poe Monard C Boots James P Conrad James T Dinser Scott J Swearingen Eastern’s Farris earns award for top 2-point field percentage in Ohio Georgetown’s Seigla earns All-District honors OHSAA announces 2017 football regions and playoffs format Western Brown volleyball camps a success with over 100 in attendance Rigdon finishes high school running career with 10th place finish at state track and field championship meet Grace E Fite Women return to county jail as funds start to run low Georgetown Council takes action on vacant structures

Inflation and your Retirement Income Strategy

You might not think much about inflation. After all, it’s been quite low for the past several years. Still, you may want to take it into account when you’re planning your retirement income strategy.

Of course, no one can really predict the future course of inflation. But it’s a pretty safe bet it won’t disappear altogether — and even a mild inflation rate, over time, can strongly erode your purchasing power.

Consider this: If you were to purchase an item today for $100, that same item, in 25 years, would cost you $209, assuming an annual inflation rate of 3%. That’s a pretty big difference.

During your working years, you can hope that your income will at least rise enough to match inflation.

But what about when you retire? How can you minimize the impact of inflation on your retirement income?

One thing you can certainly do is include an inflation assumption in your calculations of how much annual income you’ll need.

The number you choose as an inflation factor could possibly be based on recent inflation levels, but you might want to err on the conservative side and use a slightly higher figure. Since you may be retired for two or three decades, you might have to periodically adjust the inflation factor to correspond to the actual inflation rate.

Another important step is maintaining an investment portfolio that can potentially provide returns well above the inflation rate. Historically, stocks have been the only investment category — as opposed to investments such as Treasury bills and long-term government bonds — whose returns have significantly outpaced inflation.

So you may want to consider owning an appropriate percentage of stocks and stock-based investments in your portfolio, even during your retirement years.

Now, you might be concerned at the mention of the words “stocks” and “retirement years” in the same sentence.

After all, stocks will fluctuate in value, sometimes dramatically, and even though you may be retired for a long time, you won’t want to wait for years to “bounce back” from a bad year in the market. But not all investments move in the same direction at the same time; spreading your dollars among a range of asset classes — large stocks, small and mid-cap stocks, bonds, , certificates of deposit (CDs), foreign investments and so on — may help you reduce the impact of volatility on your portfolio.

And you don’t even have to rely solely on stocks to help combat inflation. You could also consider Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities, or TIPS. When you purchase a TIPS, your principal increases with inflation and decreases with deflation, as measured by the Consumer Price Index.

Your TIPS pay interest twice a year, at a fixed rate; this rate is applied to the adjusted principal, so your interest payments will rise with inflation and fall with deflation.

When your TIPS matures, you will receive adjusted principal or original principal, whichever is greater.

As is the case with other bonds, though, you could choose to sell your TIPS before it matures.*

Work with your financial advisor to help decide what moves are right for you to help protect your retirement income from inflation. It may be a “hidden” threat, but you don’t want to ignore it.

* Yield to maturity cannot be predetermined, due to uncertain future inflation adjustments.

If TIPS are sold prior to maturity, you may receive less than your initial investment amount. I

f bonds are not held in a tax-advantaged account, investors will be required to pay federal taxes on the accredited value annually, although they will not receive any principal payment until maturity.

When the inflation rate is high and the principal value is rising significantly, the taxes paid on TIPS may exceed interest income received.

Therefore, TIPS may not be suitable for investors who depend on their investments for living expenses.

Jim Holden is a local Edward Jones Financial Advisor in Georgetown. Edward Jones, it employees and financial advisors are not estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice.

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