Stranded students rescued by Brown County cooperation 4-H Teen Ambassador Dunning attends SHOT Show Veterans Service Commission invites veterans to seek help with benefits Unemployment rate rises in Brown County Pick a Lollipop, help a dog A season to remember G-Men hit the field for first baseball scrimmage Eastern’s Rigdon, Purdy earn AP SE District Div. III honors New blocking, kicking rules address risk minimization in high school football Judy A Schneider James M Darnell Lawanda R Truesdell Paul E Grisham Arrelous R Rowland Dennis E Stivers David M Daniels Fayetteville man is charged with child porn April 1st Grand Opening for Jacob’s Ladder Resale Boutique in Georgetown Talent Show auditions at Gaslight Theatre Nine indicted by county grand jury Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall visit coming next May to BC Fairgrounds In it to win it! Bronco wrestlers end season on successful note Eastern’s Hopkins finishes 5th in long jump at OATCCC State Indoor Track and Field Meet SBAAC awards academic all-stars, winning teams Marvin D Atkin Beverly S Flatt Jessie M Sanders Leroy Deck Sr Jody A Towler Sherman E Young Kenneth C Burton Varnau’s face second defamation suit Attorney General to visit Georgetown schools Clermont County GOP hosts Wenstrup, DeWine at dinner Fatal car crash in Adams County BC Chamber welcomes new Cricket Wireless store to Mt. Orab Aberdeen Council approves 2017 budget Royce K Zimmerman Lady Warriors advance to Elite 8 SBAAC awards boys basketball all-stars SBAAC girls basketball all-stars take home awards SHAC Winter Sports Awards Banquet set for March 12 Altman claims 170-pound district title Sirkka L Buller Arthur C Schneider Lowell G Neal Virginia M Schirmer Connie S Darling Harold L Purdin Terry E Frye Lucille Schumacher Lady Warriors roll to district finals Broncos take care of business to claim sectional crown G-Men upset MVCA to earn berth sectional finals WBHS JROTC Rifle Team competes at Camp Perry Lady Rockets finish 12-12 Season reaches end for Rockets Eugene D Ring Two indicted on major drug charges Two charged with home invasion Cincinnati airport expanding services, lowering prices in effort to compete Two sentenced in common pleas court Georgetown man hurt in car crash Robert G Miller Linda M Howland Robert E McKinney Mildred J Hodges Farrel L Amiott Patricia Brown Rick L Dye Mary E Nagel Betty Ratliff Broncos claim SBAAC wrestling title Broncos pull ahead for win over G-Men in SBAAC Tourney Ripley boys wrap up regular season with win at Lynchburg Eastern girls are sectional champs Anderson pleads not guilty to battery charge Some county offices to change locations Fayetteville prepares for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall HealthSource hosts Chamber of Commerce meeting Five sentenced in Brown County Common Pleas Court June Howser Marguerite A Fender Timothy D Harris Jay R Purdy Robin S Godwin Marc A Wachter Chester W Eyre Warriors blast past the G-Men, 61-40 Rockets performing well heading into post-season tournament play Lady Warriors bring home the Gold with perfect 13-0 finish in SHAC Western Brown Junior High wrestling team wraps up successful season Rockets fall victim to ‘Pack’ attack Broncos suffer heartbreaking loss to Mentor Lake Catholic in state quarterfinals Adult Education Center coming to county ‘Senior Playground’ moving forward at Georgetown park Brown County 4-H kicks off another year Eastern Middle School celebrates “Kindness Week” Billie L Shoemaker

Trouble in tomato paradise

Hot days and nights have changed the happenings in my garden. After inches and inches of rain have fallen, I finally had to water all the containers of herbs on the deck and top off the whiskey barrel water garden. The refrigerator is full of cucumbers ready to be turned into pickles and before long I will need to consider starting some batches of chili sauce.

After a walk in the garden I have noticed some changes in the bottom leaves of my tomato plants. But my biggest problem continues to be the wildlife that visit the garden and take samples of tomatoes. This morning we watched a doe helping herself to ear corn in the front field. The juvenile rabbit in the front yard no longer hops away when I walk to get the mail. Ah, life in the country.

Have you been checking for pests and disease in your landscape and vegetable garden? If you sense “troubles” in tomato paradise you should consider visiting the ohioline.osu.edu website and reading up on tomato leaf spot diseases.

Septoria Leaf Spot is a fungal disease that affects the foliage of tomatoes. It does not affect fruit directly. The disease causes rapid defoliation when weather is warm and moist. Septoria Leaf Spot produces lesions that are usually brown, circular, and small with a yellow halo. Fungal fruiting bodies know as pycnidia can be seen usually in the middle of the mature lesion as tiny, black dots.

Septoria starts on the lower leaves and works its way up the plant. OSUE Fact Sheet, Septoria Leaf Spot of Tomatoes (HYG-3112-96 at ohioline.osu.edu), provides gardeners with important tips to control Septoria: 1) Rotate out of tomatoes for four years, 2) Deep plow, preferably in the fall, to bury all plant refuse, 3) Grow tomato transplants in sterilized soil, 4) Control weeds, especially horse nettle, Jimson weed, and nightshade, and 5) Use of a protectant fungicide may be necessary to adequately control Septoria Leaf Spot when conditions are favorable for disease development. Remember to read all and follow all directions carefully.

Septoria lycopersici lives between tomato crops in the soil on infested debris of tomato and weeds. Spores formed on crop debris splash onto foliage and start the disease. Wind and rain spread spores produced in the dark bodies formed in leaf spots to adjacent uninfected leaves. The fungus is most active between 60 and 80 degrees F when rainfall is abundant.

Many leaf spot diseases can mimic each other in their early stages of development, so careful observation is very important when determining what may be affecting your tomato plants. Proper diagnosis will help you select the most appropriate management of the disease.

Some other diseases that might threaten your tomato crop include: Early Blight, Late Blight, Bacterial Spot, Blossom-End Rot, and Blossom drop without fruit set. If you would like to learn more about these special problems with tomatoes, be sure to check out the OSUE FactSheets found at ohioline.osu.edu.

I love to eat sun-warmed tomatoes right off the vine. My husband prefers carrying the salt shaker to the garden for his tomatoes. Do you salt your tomatoes or not?

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to OSUE Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

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By Faye Mahaffey

Faye Mahaffey is an OSU Master Gardner volunteer.

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