Ken Leimberger Cathye J Bunthoff Lending a holiday helping hand G’Town Christmas Parade enjoyed by spectators Mt. Orab Auto Mall collects over 1,100 canned goods for local families “Celebration of Lights” held at fairgrounds Thirteen indicted by grand jury Lady Warriors hit the hardwood with high expectations Warriors reload after graduating four starters Six seniors hit the hardwood for Rockets Lady Rockets packed with size, talent Lady G-Men to rely heavily on young talent G-Men seek improvement after last year’s three-win season Skilled crew on the return for the Blue Jays Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. crown Lady Broncos working hard toward SBAAC American Div. title after finishing as league runner-up last season Experienced crew of Lady Jays return to the hardwood Stephen C Foster Mary J Fitzgerald Tyler Hesler Herbert Polley Robert Layton Donald H Layton James T Smith Thomas M Calvert Thomas J Wolfer Cropper coaches way to 500th career victory Ohio’s Deer-Gun Season opens with more than 18,000 deer harvested Lady Broncos face talented Wilmington squad in season opener at Western Brown SHAC teams hit the hardwood for annual Boys Basketball Preview Western’s Leto and Jones excel in sophomore season of XC Lady Rockets open season with victory over Hillsboro Gary P Garrison Rev Larry T Allen Georgetown, Eastern MS honored by state Woodruff updates Chamber of Commerce Operation Christmas Child reaching out overseas G’town Christmas Parade Dec. 3 Ronald E Blessing Sharlee R West June A Goecke Rockets earn OVAL honors Ogden Court dedication set for Dec. 10 Jays host Broncos for OHSAA Foundation Game Ohio’s young hunters harvest nearly 6,000 deer during Youth Gun Season SHAC holds Girls Basketball Preview Foreclosure filed on former Meadowwood Care Facility Ten indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Nature Works Grant funds for new Senior Playground Shop with a Cop looking for donations and support BC Beekeepers Association busy rescuing honey bees Hilda F Steele Ronald L Palmer Bruce E Phillips Elizabeth J Ellison Daniel L Turner Cook inducted into OIAAA Hall of Fame Eastern honors Coach Kiser G-Men, Devils battle it out in OHSAA Foundation Game Jester is OVAL Football Player of the Year Ipad program a success in Georgetown schools Powih sentenced to six years on rape charges Air Evac team to get new headquarters building in Georgetown Four sentenced in Brown County Common Pleas Court Homer C Eldridge Dennis D Johnson SBAAC First Team soccer all-stars take home awards Ohio’s Deer-gun hunting season quickly approaching League champ Lady Broncos recognized at fall sports banquet SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, league champion teams Irene D Thurman County GOP sweeps at ballot box Landfill project to provide electricity Three indicted by County Grand Jury BREAKING ELECTION NEWS Wanda L Nixon Ella A Moon David Rogers Joanna W Carter Ann L Yeary Tony Gacek Rigdon finishes 3rd in Pickerington Div. III Regional Meet, advances to OHSAA XC State Tournament Week 10 football roundup Linkous named SBAAC American Division Soccer Player of the Year SHAC awards boys golf all-stars, winning teams Donald L Bauer Andrew W Brown Early voting still going strong at Election Board Tree ordinance brings more questions at G’Town Council Steele named new mayor in R’ville ABCAP’s Reproductive Center receives $2,000 from Jaymie Jamison Foundation Robert E Bailey Myrtle L Stiltner Etta M Mays Kathleen A Holden Eastern XC teams head to Regional Meet A season to remember Lady Warriors finish runner-up in SHAC Div. I Lady Broncos finish season 10-8-1
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Maidenhair Tree is a living fossil

Few nursery trees have as interesting a story as the Gingko. One reason is that Ginko trees are living fossils, dating back to the Early Jurassic period over 270 million years ago, surviving to the present day very much unchanged. Very few life forms can make that claim. Ginkgo was once widespread throughout the world, but by two million years ago they were only found in small area of China. That’s still the only place they grow wild, but Gingko has become a very popular landscape tree all over the world.

Gingko leaves are unique among seed plants, fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade. Two veins begin at the base and fork repeatedly but never branch out the way other tree leaves do. The common name “maidenhair tree” is because the leaves resemble the maidenhair fern. They turn bright lemon yellow before dropping in fall.

Some Ginkgo trees are female and others male. Female plants produce light yellow-brown, soft, fruit-like seeds known for their unpleasant smell, like rancid butter or vomit. This is why good nurseries only sell male Gingko trees. Although Gingko are easy to propagate from seed, nursery-grown ginkgo trees are male cuttings grafted onto plants grown from seed, because the male trees will not produce smelly seeds.

Like ferns, algae and mosses but unlike most trees, Gingkos fertilize their seeds using sperm, which are actually able to move about using flagella which have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards, propelling it to the female sex organs inside the tree’s flower.

Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching 80-100 feet, with some specimens in China being over 164 feet. They are usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.

Ginkgo is native to China; where there are examples believed to be over 1,500 years old. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism, the ginkgo is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; over the centuries it has become established in forests there. The ginkgo leaf is the symbol of the Urasenke school of Japanese tea ceremony. Ginkgos are popular subjects for bonsai; they can be kept artificially small and tended over centuries.

Ginkgos have lasted since prehistory because they are tough survivors, tolerating pollution and confined soil spaces. They rarely suffer disease problems, even in city conditions, and are attacked by few insects. An extreme example of their hardiness is that in Hiroshima, Japan, where six trees growing less than a mile from the 1945 atom bomb explosion were among the few living things in the area to survive the blast. While almost all other plants (and animals) in the area were destroyed, the Ginkgos survived and are still alive today.

Their nut-like seed kernels are a traditional Chinese food, served at special occasions such as weddings and the Chinese New Year. In Chinese culture, they are believed to have health benefits; some also consider them to have aphrodisiac qualities. Japanese cooks add ginkgo seeds to some traditional dishes, or serve them as a garnish. Extracts of ginkgo leaves are believed to have healthful and curative properties. According to some studies, ginkgo can significantly improve attention in healthy individuals. Many studies have indicated other health benefits.

I first saw Gingko trees growing in an oil refinery, where they thrived despite noxious fumes and poor soil. Since that time we’ve planted dozens of them, and never had one fail. We recommend them as memorial trees because of their ruggedness, their timeless quality and their connection to the earliest forms of life on earth. We believe that a tree with the ability to survive hundreds, even thousands of years, is the perfect choice for a living memorial.

Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Nursery & Landscape, located near Winchester, Ohio at 9736 Tri-County Highway. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 587-7021.

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