Moore sentenced to 16 years in prison for assault Tea Party holds candidate forum Hamersville Police Dept. introduces newest officer Russellville Council takes action on closing alleys Anthony R Traylor Caryl J Eyre Jays clinch 2nd in SHAC Division I Week 7 football roundup Battle between Eastern, Ripley ends in tie Broncos are SBAAC American Divison champs Lady Rockets enter final game of regular season on 3-game win streak Lady G-Men claim wins over Manchester, Bethel-Tate Lady Broncos win at New Richmond, rise to first in SBAAC American Division standings Judge approves sale of hospital Trump losing support in Ohio delegation Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Joyce A Mignerey George W Kilgore Vernon Creighton Brittany A Perkins Sister Jane Stier Jeff Bess Russell Rockwell Lady Warriors looking to get back to winning ways G-Men rise to 2nd in SBAAC Nat’l Division Western Brown volleyball team jumps to 12-6 with wins over Norwood, CNE Week six football roundup Track champions determined at MRP in an exciting night of racing action Sectional tourney play begins for Western Brown girls tennis Phillips, Sininger advance to district golf tourney Christopher W Baker Sherry A Napier Betty L Kelley Virginia E Deininger Shirley J Carr 2016 Brown County Fair comes to an end Coroner appeals ruling on Goldson investigation Ripley Federal merges with Southern Hills RUCK March set to raise veteran suicide awareness Louise I McCann Louise I McCann Jackie Garrison Kathy S Jordan Rockets rally for first league win Lady Broncos rise to 10-6 with win at Wilmington Broncos begin quest for SBAAC American Div. title Lady G-Men looking to bounce back from recent losses SHAC golf season in the books Lady Rockets top Whiteoak Fair Royalty chosen for 2016 Troop Box Ministry still going strong after 15 years Three sentenced in Common Pleas Alex K Miller Denvil Burchell Maneva H Teague Vincent A Cluxton Stanley J Brannock Robert L Dyer Mary L Phillips Broncos gallop to 9-0-1 with win over G-Men Tight battle continues for SBAAC American Division volleyball title Jays rally for win over Rockets Week 4 football roundup Sininger is SBAAC Nat’l Division Golfer of Year Lady Rockets top CCD, fall to CNE Janet R Reveal Paul D Hines Gas skimmers stealing identities Democrats meet in G’town Humane Society horses now up for adoption New ‘B-Fit Program’ at this year’s fair Drug Task Force marijuana eradication Cheryl L Sams Aaron S Cartwright Tommie E Stout Rockets soar past the Warriors, 5-0 G-Men place runner-up in Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady Warriors cruise to victory over Fayetteville Broncos remain unbeaten at 6-0-1 Lady G-Men win at Ripley Week 3 football roundup Broncos lead after round two of SBAAC American Division play Ohana Music Festival a huge success Man charged with 292 counts of child porn possession G’Town Council resolves zoning issues, to hold public meeting on medical marijuana Chase pleads guilty to obscenity charges Georgetown Nativity Scene to be on display, much longer this year Georgetown Police Chief Rob Freeland, updates council on village happenings Jay R Crawford Kenneth James Verne Wisby, Sr Kenneth J Barber Olivette F Corbett David E Kelsey, Sr Betty A Stegbauer Virginia McConnaughey Chantal C Cook Chase pleads guilty to obscenity charges Brown County jobless rate at 16 year low UC to eliminate smoking on campus

Summer refresh for re-blooming Daylilies

If re-blooming Daylilies are cut back and fertilized when they turn brown, they will come back and bloom better than ever.

So-called “re-blooming” daylilies give you constant color for the entire season, unlike regular daylilies. They will rest for a week or two after their spring flush, and then bloom sporadically until frost. The key to their extended season is constant expansion of the root system, since blossom production is directly tied to root growth. This is why newly planted daylilies will bloom longer; once the soil becomes exhausted they will not re-bloom.

Our personal favorite, the frilly, bright lemon-yellow “Happy Returns,” represents this new generation of re-blooming daylilies. The golden yellow “Stella D’Oro” was introduced several years before Happy Returns, so it’s more common. Starting with full, compact, emerald green plants that look like ornamental grass, both varieties are covered with blooms by late May.

By mid-July, re-blooming daylilies have replaced their blooms with a crop of seed pods, and the foliage is streaked with brown. Not a pretty sight. At this point in the season we recommend cutting the entire plant off at ground level, and fertilizing with Espoma Bulb-Tone or Flower Tone. This mid-season haircut and feeding makes re-bloomers bounce back stronger than ever. Healthy plants immediately put up fresh green foliage, and within a month they’ll be covered with blooms once again.

Daylily clumps become root-bound eventually, running out of fertile, loose soil to expand into. After a four or five years, you should dig the clumps up and divide them, mixing Bulb Tone or Flower Tone into the loosened soil. You can cut through the matted clumps with a bread knife or a sharp spade, or pry them apart using two digging forks back to back.

When you plant daylilies (or any plant for that matter) you should dig a hole much wider than you need to, and mix a good time-release fertilizer into the soil as you refill around the plant. Bulb-Tone works best for daylilies, because it’s rich in bone meal and trace minerals that help feed healthy blooms. The better you do at planting daylilies originally, the longer you can wait before you have to divide them.

Daylilies get their name from the fact that each flower bud will bloom for only one day and then wither. Healthy plants have many buds on each stalk, and multiple stalks on each plant, so they provide color for quite a long season even though each flower lasts less than 24 hours.

The daylily is often called “the perfect perennial,” due to its dazzling colors, drought tolerance, hardiness, and generally carefree nature. Daylilies make a terrific ground cover on banks and under fences, crowding out weeds. Re-bloomers like “Happy Returns” and “Stella D’Oro” do a wonderful job as perennial borders. Every garden should have some.

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