Western Brown’s Leto excels in Australia Rockets ready for 1st season in SBAAC Paddling, hiking activities available at Ohio State Parks SB Warriors get set to hit gridiron for 2nd year of varsity football Scotty W Johnson Glenna V Moertle Ricky L Hoffer Ruth E Ward David A Watson Janet L Dotson Vilvie S King Steven C Utter Cropper joins Fallis at Bethel-Tate Local kids find success in world of martial arts 13th annual Bronco 5K Run and Fitness Walk set for Aug. 5 Teams compete in memory of Randy Fulton Mike W Smith Roger Helton David A Borders Timothy E Argenbright Joseph W Sherrill Frances K Pedigo Cecil N Graham Sawyers charged in sex for heroin plot Group demands changes at ELSD Blanche Malblanc Pauline L Kirk Over 70 take part in 11th Joe Myers 5K Classic Lions Club 4th of July Festival brings outdoor fun to Ripley ODNR reminds visitors to swim safe this summer Changes in high school track and field/cross country rules include school issued and approved uniforms Betty L Philpott Judy B Williams Billie J Russell Remembering Ravye 25 attend volleyball camp in Fayetteville Western Brown hosts Pee Wee Football Camp Eugene L Baumann Kids enjoy a ‘Touch-a-Truck’ event in Mt. Orab New police chief takes over in Fayetteville BC Chamber moving forward on 2017 SummerFest Two killed in wrong way crash in Mt. Orab Jack Hamilton Charles L Glover Maxine M Stires Western Brown youth basketball camps a success Leto to represent Team USA in Australia Broncos hard at work in preparation for fall season Eastern approves bowling team Phyllis Ruth Lois A Manley Eddie L Carr Thomas L Carnahan Cameron Barkley Walter J McGee Gary J Graham George D Johnson Walter F Crawford Jr Charles E Meranda Jr Corbin testifies before Ohio Senate Five arrested in Hamersville drug bust Neil Diamond tribute band coming Hyde finds home at Midway Youngsters work to improve on hoop skills at Eastern basketball camps Sizer named All-District Honorable Mention Western Brown’s Barnes earns All-State, All-District honors Local players compete in SWOFCA Ron Woyan East/West All-Star Game 6th annual Ravye Williams Memorial 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament set for June 24 Clarence E Teal Rosie B Poe Monard C Boots James P Conrad James T Dinser Scott J Swearingen Eastern’s Farris earns award for top 2-point field percentage in Ohio Georgetown’s Seigla earns All-District honors OHSAA announces 2017 football regions and playoffs format Western Brown volleyball camps a success with over 100 in attendance Rigdon finishes high school running career with 10th place finish at state track and field championship meet Grace E Fite Women return to county jail as funds start to run low Georgetown Council takes action on vacant structures Veterans honored in Mt. Orab John McGee Timmy Burson Patricia A London Mary J Hall Kenneth R Behymer Western Brown’s Joe Sams commits to Marietta College WBHS to hold girls youth basketball camp Huseman signs with UC Clermont Day to continue baseball career on collegiate level at UC Clermont Western’s Pack signs with NKU WBHS to host youth boys basketball camp Eastern’s Rigdon, Hopkins are STATE BOUND James Ratliff Robert P Lesko Armstrong sentenced to twenty years on child porn possession charges Russellville hires new Village Clerk Russellville Council approves purchase of two ambulances

Summer refresh for re-blooming Daylilies

If re-blooming Daylilies are cut back and fertilized when they turn brown, they will come back and bloom better than ever.

So-called “re-blooming” daylilies give you constant color for the entire season, unlike regular daylilies. They will rest for a week or two after their spring flush, and then bloom sporadically until frost. The key to their extended season is constant expansion of the root system, since blossom production is directly tied to root growth. This is why newly planted daylilies will bloom longer; once the soil becomes exhausted they will not re-bloom.

Our personal favorite, the frilly, bright lemon-yellow “Happy Returns,” represents this new generation of re-blooming daylilies. The golden yellow “Stella D’Oro” was introduced several years before Happy Returns, so it’s more common. Starting with full, compact, emerald green plants that look like ornamental grass, both varieties are covered with blooms by late May.

By mid-July, re-blooming daylilies have replaced their blooms with a crop of seed pods, and the foliage is streaked with brown. Not a pretty sight. At this point in the season we recommend cutting the entire plant off at ground level, and fertilizing with Espoma Bulb-Tone or Flower Tone. This mid-season haircut and feeding makes re-bloomers bounce back stronger than ever. Healthy plants immediately put up fresh green foliage, and within a month they’ll be covered with blooms once again.

Daylily clumps become root-bound eventually, running out of fertile, loose soil to expand into. After a four or five years, you should dig the clumps up and divide them, mixing Bulb Tone or Flower Tone into the loosened soil. You can cut through the matted clumps with a bread knife or a sharp spade, or pry them apart using two digging forks back to back.

When you plant daylilies (or any plant for that matter) you should dig a hole much wider than you need to, and mix a good time-release fertilizer into the soil as you refill around the plant. Bulb-Tone works best for daylilies, because it’s rich in bone meal and trace minerals that help feed healthy blooms. The better you do at planting daylilies originally, the longer you can wait before you have to divide them.

Daylilies get their name from the fact that each flower bud will bloom for only one day and then wither. Healthy plants have many buds on each stalk, and multiple stalks on each plant, so they provide color for quite a long season even though each flower lasts less than 24 hours.

The daylily is often called “the perfect perennial,” due to its dazzling colors, drought tolerance, hardiness, and generally carefree nature. Daylilies make a terrific ground cover on banks and under fences, crowding out weeds. Re-bloomers like “Happy Returns” and “Stella D’Oro” do a wonderful job as perennial borders. Every garden should have some.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2016 News Democrat