Michael D Karos Jr John H Kirk Janet R Meyer Patsy A Clark Dorothy J Schroeder Broncos trample the G-Men, 73-40 Rockets down the Devils, 59-55 Seven new inductees to enter WBHS Sports Hall of Fame Lady Warriors ascend to 13-1 Broncos finish 2nd of 22 teams in Hammer and Anvil Invitational Hedwig Lambert Billie G Walkup Some county offices may be moved G’town Council approves 2017 budget Family doubles in size with adoption Sardinia Mayor looks forward to 2017 2017 Fayetteville Firemen’s Festival set Floyd Newberry Jr Donna F Lang Gene Warren Dwight L Fulton Virginia A O’Neil Anne L Durbin-Thomas Marietta Dunn Charles L Latchford Broncos win ‘Battle of 32’ Lady Broncos claim win over Bethel-Tate Jays top Warriors, fall to Mustangs Lady Warriors claim top spot in SHAC with win over Lynchburg-Clay Broncos buck the Lions, 54-51 James N DeHaas Questions still linger in Stuart explosion New direction for Brittany Stykes case New public safety director now on duty in Brown Co. Fayetteville Mayor anticipates a good year for the village Chamber of Commerce announces awardees Robert Bechdolt Carl E Lindsey Audrey F Maher LeJeune Howser Tammy L Connor Henry C Mayhall Jr Chad Spilker Frank W Kemmeter Jr Wanda J Howard Dorothy Huff Colon C Malott Eastern varsity teams come out on top to capture Brown County Holiday Classic crowns WBHS Army JROTC hosts rifle shooting competition Bronco varsity wrestling team unbeaten at 8-0 Blue Jays finish 1-1 in Ripley Pepsi Classic Mona G Van Vooren Hiram Beardsworth Avery W McCleese Ethel E Long Children learn safety from ‘Officer Phil’ Microchips can help locate lost pets Local GOP plans trip to Washington Three sentenced in common pleas Estel Earhart Roy Stewart Tenacious ‘D’ leads Lady Jays to victory over Blanchester on day one of Ripley Pepsi Classic Fayetteville’s Thompson, Jester earn SWOFCA All-City honors Jays fall to Blanchester on first day of Pepsi Classic Ticket details announced for OHSAA basketball and wrestling state tournaments Jerri K McKenzie Randy D Vaughn Georgetown JR/SR high to have new library Georgetown saw many improvements in 2016 Three sentenced in common pleas court Esther O Brown G-Men go on scoring rampage for 77-41 win over Cardinals Warriors climb to 4-2 with wins over West Union, Lynchburg Rockets top Whiteoak for first win Shirley M Bray Carter Lumber closes in G’town Wenstrup looks forward to 2017 Seven indicted by county grand jury John Ruthven holds pre-Christmas Open House New pet boarding facility now open in Georgetown Denver W Emmons Carl W Liebig Mary L McKinley Blake C Roush Louis A Koewler William D Cornetet Western Brown dedicates Perry Ogden Court Lady Warrior win streak hits 5 Lady Rockets wrap up tough week on the hardwood Barons rally for win over Broncos Georgetown to hire two paid Firefighter/EMT’s Noble receives statewide law enforcement award County helps family in need after house fire Flashing signs banned in G’town historic district ‘Christmas Extravaganza’ at Gaslight Thelma L Ernst Roy L Bruce Ken Leimberger Cathye J Bunthoff Lending a holiday helping hand

‘Making their future better’

Four employees of Grow Inc. stand in front of the organization’s greenhouse with staff worker Kathy Violette. From left, Bennie, Eddie, Violette, Tommy and Charlie.

Grow Inc., located at 9116 Hamer Road, completes jobs including gardening, mowing lawns, automotive work, cleaning and other repairs.

GEORGETOWN — You may not always see them around the community, but there is a group of people earning a living behind the scenes.

The employees of Grow Inc. are proud of their work. Housed at the Brown County Habilitation Center on Hamer Road, Grow Inc. employees construct plaques, carve wooden benches and chairs, work in a greenhouse and mow grass and do gardening work around Brown County.

They also have contracts with the Ohio Department of Transportation in Highland and Brown counties, working janitorial duties and landscaping, and bagging tools with Stanley Tools. They also do car washes, inside and out.

The 30-or-so employees, working with a workshop staff, are able to provide a living for themselves that they may not otherwise have outside of the workshop.

“I like the place, I like the individuals, I like the staff, and it’s a good place to come to work and hang out and get your stress out,” said Eddie. “I like to work and make money, too.”

According to its website, Grow Inc. is a nonprofit adult workshop employing citizens with developmental disabilities.

Its mission statement states the organization’s goal is to “create and maintain a business that provides high quality service and products to customers, while providing comprehensive training, career growth, job placements and other vocational opportunities for individuals with disabilities and workers with disadvantages, to improve the quality of their personal life and occupational abilities.”

Syl Flores, of Future Without Poverty, a nonprofit organization focused on helping the involuntary poor and providing them with jobs and economic opportunities, hired Grow Inc. to work on the Ripley community garden and to create plaques for his organization.

“The first time I came in here, I really fell in love with the people,” Flores said. “Whenever I see a spot that we can use some help, I go here, to Grow Inc., and team up with them. These guys really appreciate whatever they get. They take pride in it. It’s really impressive. I’m really proud of them.”

“I would recommend this place to anybody. If anybody’s looking for a job, this is the place to be,” said Bennie, an employee.

All four of the employees interviewed live on their own, either alone or with a sibling or girlfriend. But when they come to work during the week, the employees get to be with a “family” of their own.

“This is my family. I don’t have much family (left), and this is my family,” Bennie said. “These guys are like brothers to me.”

“What I’ve noticed is that no one looks down on each other,” Flores said. “It’s just wonderful.”

Flores, the employees, and Kathy Violette, a staff worker in the workshop, all hope that the employees’ increased visibility working out in the community would help bring more attention to the workshop, either to bring more workers or bring more work to those already there.

“I would like the community to take a look and see if there might by something they need that can be done by one of these guys or the other people here,” Flores said. “I was unaware of this place until I happened to be looking for a place to make plaques. That’s really my hope, that people will take a look.’

“These guys are all about making their future better,” Violette said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2016 News Democrat