Some Georgetown School staff members will be armed this fall Local Democrats host Jerry Springer at dinner Chamber of Commerce discusses development Gerald P Morel Lady Broncos capture softball program’s 5th straight SBAAC American Division title Warriors on top in SHAC Division I standings Lady Broncos take first in Western Brown Track Invite Rockets leading way in SHAC Div. II James E Newman Paul E Funk Alan Hanselman Robert V Nash III Frances L Poole Minnie E Fisher Donovan M Pope Irvin E Stiens Myrtle L Lane Ralph L Davidson August J Pace Carl R Brown Phyllis J Beard Lady G-Men complete sweep of Tigers in SBAAC Nat’l Division G-Men pluck Cardinals, 6-4 Warriors climb to 4-1 in SHAC with victory over North Adams Broncos rally in 7th for 5-4 win over Batavia Blue Jays still in search of first win Three million dollar jail expansion planned Higginsport enforcing speed with camera Unemployment rate falls in county, southern Ohio Varnau not restricted from talking online about Goldson case Rockets fall to 4-1 in SHAC with loss to North Adams Bronco tennis team tops Bethel-Tate, 5-0 Lady G-Men rise to 7-4 with win at Goshen Lady Broncos’ big bats hammer out 11-0 win over Batavia G-Men showing improvement Keith Shouse Diane L Steele August Hensley Louise R Murrell Fire strikes Mt. Orab Bible Baptist Church Grant Days 2017 attractions Man accused of sex crime, giving pot to kids Ten indicted by Brown County Grand Jury 5th Annual Rick Eagan Memorial 5K Run/Walk coming up in May Birds of Prey Three sentenced in common pleas court John H Young II Sally A Gibson Barbara Burris Mary Ann Napier Martha L Newland Marlene Thompson Patricia A Firrell Kellie J Berry Mt. Orab, Hamersville students take part in ‘Hoops for Heart’ Eastern players take part in District 14 All-Star Games DeWine meets with local officials Eastern Superintendent praises students accomplishments during board meeting Local author’s story appears in new book Four sentenced in common pleas court Three to run for Municipal Judge Grant Days 2017 coming in April Lincoln’s Generals at Grant Days Brenda R Harris Mock crash staged at Georgetown High School Georgetown to hire eighth full time police officer Reception honoring Becky Cropper April 2 PRC to host annual community supper Rockets blast past the Blue Jays Georgetown hosts ‘season opener’ track and field invite Lady Rockets cruise to 10-0 win over Ripley Lady Warriors, Lady G-Men split games in season opener double-header Bobby A Reed Harold L Barger Ralph M Gaither Stranded students rescued by Brown County cooperation 4-H Teen Ambassador Dunning attends SHOT Show Veterans Service Commission invites veterans to seek help with benefits Unemployment rate rises in Brown County Pick a Lollipop, help a dog A season to remember G-Men hit the field for first baseball scrimmage Eastern’s Rigdon, Purdy earn AP SE District Div. III honors New blocking, kicking rules address risk minimization in high school football Judy A Schneider James M Darnell Lawanda R Truesdell Paul E Grisham Arrelous R Rowland Dennis E Stivers David M Daniels Fayetteville man is charged with child porn April 1st Grand Opening for Jacob’s Ladder Resale Boutique in Georgetown Talent Show auditions at Gaslight Theatre Nine indicted by county grand jury Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall visit coming next May to BC Fairgrounds In it to win it! Bronco wrestlers end season on successful note Eastern’s Hopkins finishes 5th in long jump at OATCCC State Indoor Track and Field Meet SBAAC awards academic all-stars, winning teams

Gardening in July

Rain, rain, rain, and more rain! I hope to hoe weeds in the garden tomorrow, but I might have to lay down cardboard so I don’t sink down in the mud. All the tomatoes are blooming and I have picked a few little yellow tomatoes that mysteriously did not make it to the house.

The wet weather has been tough on my pepper plants. They just seem to be sitting “still” and waiting for hot weather. The okra continues to grow, but no blooms yet. The cucumbers are blooming away and I have sliced onions and cucumbers chilling in the fridge.

How is your garden doing? My basil is not enjoying all the wet weather. The deer have eaten all my Hosta leaves down at the cabin and have actually moved closer to the house. The Asparagus ferns in my pots on the porch have been stripped and my poor pansies were eaten to the ground.

I had hoped that the leaves on my Big Blue Hosta would be too tough to eat … wrong.

As I watch the doe with her twin fawns romp around the Spruce trees in the lower yard, it is hard to smile after the destruction they have caused this year.

The butterflies are enjoying the mud around the property. The Zebra Swallowtails were happy to pose for a photograph. They are Ohio’s smallest swallowtail and among the showiest. Their host plant is the Pawpaw (Asimina triloba), a shrub or small tree of rich woods, particularly on stream terraces. July is a great time to get out your butterfly reference book and walk around your gardens.

My favorite Garden Almanac list includes the following tasks for the month of July:

Turn the compost pile – remember to balance the “wet and green, brown and dry”; keep up with weeds in garden beds; water your garden during periods of drought – plants most vulnerable to the effects of drought include seedling, young plants and recent transplants; finish transplanting annuals; fertilize container plants regularly; stake tall plants growing in windy sites; cut spent perennials to the ground to encourage new growth; deadhead flowers to prolong bloom time; cut back daffodil leaves after they turn yellow; continue planting broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower transplants for fall crops; continue direct-seeding vegetable and herb crops; beginning mid-month, direct-seed vegetables such as spinach for fall crops; harvest onions and garlic after the tops start to yellow and die back; harvest and dry herbs for winter use.

Give your vegetable garden at least 1 inch of water per week during periods of drought. Remember that leafy crops such as lettuce are especially sensitive to dry soil, and will develop bitter-tasting leaves or set seed prematurely as a result.

Have you ever considered planting an edible edging in your flower bed? Lettuce – especially colorful or frilly-foliaged leaf varieties – can be used instead of sweet alyssum, or other low-growing annuals that are often used to edge flower beds.

Now is the time to be taking notes on your developing color schemes in your flower beds. Watch how your garden evolves during the growing season and how you can improve it by adding, subtracting, or rearranging elements of color.

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

I hope that your gardens are growing and that we will all be enjoying the rewards of our labor soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2016 News Democrat